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I am setting up a new Nagios install using OMD & check_mk instead of doing everything by hand this time. The switches do not have proper hostnames in DNS so check_mk provides a method to specify the IP in the config file. I was converting the configuration file for some switches last night and I tried for a few minutes to do it one shot but then threw in the towel.

Example input:

define host{
    use         generic-switch
    host_name   BAR.MDF.MODEL
    alias       BAR.MDF.MODEL
    parents     FOO.MDF.MODEL.01
    address     10.1.1.1
    }

Required output:

ipaddresses = {
  "BAR.MDF.MODEL" : "10.1.1.1",
}

Here is what I did.

I knew that IPs were always after host_name so it is fairly safe/consistent

{ awk '/host_name/ || /address/ { print $2 }' < switch.cfg; } >> out.txt

which got me

BAR.MDF.MODEL
10.1.1.1

Then I did this

{ awk '!/^1/{ getline ip; print $0, ip; next }' < out.txt; } >> out2.txt

to get this:

BAR.MDF.MODEL 10.1.1.1

the rest of the formating was done in vim via 'norm' & macros etc

  "BAR.MDF.MODEL" : "10.1.1.1",
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try if this could work for you. Only awk.

Assuming following data of infile

define host{
    use         generic-switch
    host_name   BAR.MDF.MODEL
    alias       BAR.MDF.MODEL
    parents     FOO.MDF.MODEL.01
    address     10.1.1.1
    }
define host{
    use         generic-switch
    host_name   BAR.MDF.MODEL.2
    alias       BAR.MDF.MODEL
    parents     FOO.MDF.MODEL.01
    address     10.1.1.2
    }
define host{
    use         generic-switch
    host_name   BAR.MDF.MODEL.3
    alias       BAR.MDF.MODEL
    parents     FOO.MDF.MODEL.01
    address     10.1.1.3
    }

Run this awk script:

awk '
    BEGIN { print "ipaddresses = {"; } 
    $1 == "host_name" { 
        hostname = "\"" $2 "\""; 
        next; 
    } 
    $1 == "address" { 
        address = "\"" $2 "\"";
        printf "\t%s : %s,\n", hostname, address;
    } 
    END {
        printf "}\n";
    }
' switch.cfg

That yields:

ipaddresses = {
        "BAR.MDF.MODEL" : "10.1.1.1",
        "BAR.MDF.MODEL.2" : "10.1.1.2",
        "BAR.MDF.MODEL.3" : "10.1.1.3",
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is $1 == "host_name" { shorthand for if ($1 == "host_name") {? Am I reading that right? It evals to true then variable "hostname" is set to $2? Sort of like [[ -e file ]] && rm file in bash? –  Ryan Oct 6 '12 at 19:06
    
oops. I didn't think to mention it...this does work for the first host definition in switch.cfg but there are 39 of them. :s –  Ryan Oct 6 '12 at 19:15
1  
@Ryan: Updated answer. To your first question, yes. If the condition succeeds, execute instructions inside curly braces. –  Birei Oct 7 '12 at 8:50
    
I actually thought while taking a walk today...hrmm wasn't there a break or an exit in there that I could get rid of. I wonder if that would work. Came back to try it and saw your update. Thanks a lot. Definitely learned a couple things here I will use again later. –  Ryan Oct 8 '12 at 6:37

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