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I have an Excel program that I maintain for my company that needs to be updated occasionally. Currently, I send out any new versions of the Excel program by email attachment. However, people rarely check their emails, and I'm afraid most people are using an outdated version. I have the current version number saved in a Google Spreadsheet. I would like to create a Macro in Excel that runs on Workbook open that references the cell value in the Google Spreadsheet that contains the correct version number, and checks to see if it is higher than the user's version. Is this possible?

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Here's a link: Get Data From Google Docs – Daniel Cook Oct 6 '12 at 19:57
    
For just the version number, Google Docs is an overkill. If my assumption is correct that you will put the latest version of your excel workbook out in the web somewhere, for people to download. The http HEAD tells you what is the date-modified. – Robert Co Oct 7 '12 at 16:09
    
@DanielCook Thank you for that. – user1721009 Oct 7 '12 at 20:54
    
@RobertCo After looking at the website Daniel posted, yeah I do believe that using Google Docs would be overkill. My problem is I can't upload the Excel program anywhere online because it contains proprietary information, so my company won't allow it. Do you have any ideas that would accomplish what I need? I just want to find a way to have the macro to check something online to see if the user is using an old version. – user1721009 Oct 7 '12 at 20:57
    
He's a trick that I do. 1. I open a "utility" workbook that contains a macro that will check a shared drive for new updates. 2. If the workbook is up to date, close the utlity workbook and skip the rest of the steps. Otherwise. 3. Close the original workbook. 4. Copy over the new file. 5. Re-open. 6. Obviously, it will try to re open the utility so check if it's already opened. – Robert Co Oct 9 '12 at 0:09

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