Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had a wrong perception that template function in a class is instantiated only if it's invoked. See the below simple code:

template<typename T>
struct A
{
  T *p; 
  T& operator * () { return *p; }
};

int main ()
{
  A<int> ai;   // ok
  int i = *ai;  // works fine
  A<void> av;  // compiler complains even "*av" is not called
}

Just while declaring A<void>, compiler errors out as:

error: forming reference to void

I tried to specialize the function for void outside the template as below:

template<>
void A<void>::operator * () {}

But it doesn't help and gives error as:

error: no member function ‘operator*’ declared in ‘A<void>’

Is there any way to fix this with C++03 ?

share|improve this question
1  
Yeah well, you ARE invoking the template. Plus, the way you invoke it, you're even creating a variable so there's calls to constructors and destructors, which is even more "invoking" than just mentioning the type. –  Christian Stieber Oct 6 '12 at 18:14
    
Sorry, what are you trying to do? –  Kiril Kirov Oct 6 '12 at 18:16
1  
@Christian: Member functions of class templates are not instantiated unless used. –  Xeo Oct 6 '12 at 18:18
    
@KirilKirov, that will be too much to explain as the actual code is complex. So I just demonstrated only working example. In brief, I can say that I have created a smart pointer A, which should be convertible from any type to A<void> and there are subsequent requirements. –  iammilind Oct 6 '12 at 18:19
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What about

template < typename T >
struct ReferenceOrVoid
{ typedef T& Value; };

template < >
struct ReferenceOrVoid < void >
{ typedef void Value; };

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    T *p; 
    typename ReferenceOrVoid < T > :: Value
    operator * () { return *p; }
};

Of course it depends what you want A to behave in case T is void. You can also specialise the whole A struct for void, of course.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The signature of the function will be instantiated, the body of the function will not. T is substituted in the whole class definition, no matter if you're using the function or not. Note that this:

template<typename T>
struct A
{
  T *p; 
  T *operator * () { return p->aklsdjlkasjd(); }
};

int main ()
{
  A<void> av;  
}

Will compile since you're not using operator*.

share|improve this answer
1  
Additionally the attempt at providing an explicit specialization for A<void>::operator* fails because it doesn't match the declaration in the primary template: the return types are different. (Which is the intent of the OP of course, but is not allowed.) –  Luc Danton Oct 6 '12 at 18:22
add comment

I think it is sufficient if you give the function a different return type for void:

template <typename T>
struct is _void {
    enum { value = false };
};
template <>
struct is_void<> {
    enum { value = true };
};

struct A {
    ...
    typename enable_if<!is_void<T::value>, T&>::type
    operator*() {
        ...
    }
};

Since the signature may still be checked you may need to use a conditional type, e.g., making it void when instantiated with void:

template <bool, typename T1, typename>
struct conditional {
    typedef T1 type;
};
template <typename T1, typename T2>
struct conditional<false, T1, T2> {
    typedef T2 type;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Just from the glimps of your answer, I figured out that I need to make return type changeable, and I came up with the solution which is exactly matching as @DyP's answer. Still +1 to this. –  iammilind Oct 6 '12 at 18:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.