Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

can someone explain me the difference between the 2 programs, basically the difference between generic and object. also why System.out.println("adding 1 to the set: " + vs.add(new String("Hello"))); works only for the first program

First Vector set program

import java.util.Vector;

class VectorSet1 {
boolean add(Object obj) {
        if (contains(obj)) return false;
    v.add(obj);
    return true;
}

boolean contains(Object obj) {return v.contains(obj);}

public String toString() {return v.toString();}

void clear() {v.clear();}

int size() {return v.size();}

boolean isEmpty() {return v.isEmpty();}

Vector v = new Vector();

public static void main(String [] args) {
    VectorSet1 vs = new VectorSet1();

    System.out.println("set: " + vs);

    System.out.println("adding 1 to the set: " + vs.add(1));
    System.out.println("adding 5 to the set: " + vs.add(5));
    System.out.println("adding 17 to the set: " + vs.add(17));
    System.out.println("adding 1 to the set: " + vs.add(1));
    //System.out.println("adding 1 to the set: " + vs.add(new   String("Hello")));

    System.out.println("set: " + vs);

    System.out.println("testing if 1 s in the set: " + vs.contains(1));
    System.out.println("testing if 17 is in the set: " + vs.contains(17));
    System.out.println("testing if 6 is in the set: " + vs.contains(6));

    System.out.println("set is empty: " + vs.isEmpty());
    System.out.println("size of set: " + vs.size());


    vs.clear();

    System.out.println("after invoking clear");

    System.out.println("set: " + vs);

    System.out.println("set is empty: " + vs.isEmpty());
    System.out.println("size of set: " + vs.size());
}
}

Second Vector set program

import java.util.Vector;
import java.util.Iterator;

class VectorSet2<E> {
boolean add(E e) {
        if (contains(e)) return false;
    v.add(e);
    return true;
}

boolean contains(E e) {return v.contains(e);}

public String toString() {return v.toString();}

void clear() {v.clear();}

int size() {return v.size();}

boolean isEmpty() {return v.isEmpty();}

Vector<E> v = new Vector<E>();

public static void main(String [] args) {
    VectorSet2<Integer> vs = new VectorSet2<Integer>();

    System.out.println("set: " + vs);

    System.out.println("adding 1 to the set: " + vs.add(1));
    System.out.println("adding 5 to the set: " + vs.add(5));
    System.out.println("adding 17 to the set: " + vs.add(17));
    System.out.println("adding 1 to the set: " + vs.add(1));
    //System.out.println("adding Hello to the set: " + vs.add("Hello"));

    System.out.println("set: " + vs);

    System.out.println("testing if 1 s in the set: " + vs.contains(1));
    System.out.println("testing if 17 is in the set: " + vs.contains(17));
    System.out.println("testing if 6 is in the set: " + vs.contains(6));

    System.out.println("set is empty: " + vs.isEmpty());
    System.out.println("size of set: " + vs.size());


    vs.clear();

    System.out.println("after invoking clear");

    System.out.println("set: " + vs);

    System.out.println("set is empty: " + vs.isEmpty());
    System.out.println("size of set: " + vs.size());
}
}
share|improve this question
5  
1  
You should ask what's difficult for you to understand between both examples, not asking a great explanation about the code. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 6 '12 at 18:38
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you create a VectorSet2, you specify a type for its elements. In the case of the second program, that type is Integer. A String is not an Integer, so you can't add a String to a VectorSet2.

A VectorSet1, though, can have elements of any type (anything that can be treated as an Object). So if you have a VectorSet1, you can add any object to it, whether it's a String, Integer, or any other kind of object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.