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I can't figure out why it's always returning the value of arg1. I'm building a weight converter.

public double convert(double arg1,int arg2,int arg3) {
    // arg1 = amount, arg2 = from, arg3 = to
    double milligram = 1;
    double gram = 1000;
    double ounce = 28349.5;
    double pound = 453592;
    double answer = 0;
    switch(arg2) {
    case 0: switch(arg3) { // if milligram
            case 0: answer = (arg1 * milligram) / milligram;
            case 1: answer = (arg1 * milligram) / gram;
            case 2: answer = (arg1 * milligram) / ounce;
            case 3: answer = (arg1 * milligram) / pound;
    }
    case 1: switch(arg3) { // if gram
            case 0: answer = (arg1 * gram) / milligram;
            case 1: answer = (arg1 * gram) / gram;
            case 2: answer = (arg1 * gram) / ounce;
            case 3: answer = (arg1 * gram) / pound;
    }
    case 2: switch(arg3) { // if ounce
            case 0: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / milligram;
            case 1: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / gram;
            case 2: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / ounce;
            case 3: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / pound;
    }
    case 3: switch(arg3) { // if pound
            case 0: answer = (arg1 * pound) / milligram;
            case 1: answer = (arg1 * pound) / gram;
            case 2: answer = (arg1 * pound) / ounce;
            case 3: answer = (arg1 * pound) / pound;
    }
    } // end arg2 switch
    return answer;
}

I messed up somewhere in my logic, but I'm failing to see where. Any help would be appreciated.

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1  
Why don't you just name your arguments amount, from and to? –  Brendan Long Oct 6 '12 at 18:47
    
In this case, it would be better to use arrays and remove the switches altogether. Something like answer = (arg1 * conv[arg2]) / conv[arg3]; –  irrelephant Oct 6 '12 at 18:48
    
@irrelephant I prefer to use switch statements as they're easier for me to understand. I haven't used them in a long time so I completely forgot about having to break each case. –  dead beef Oct 6 '12 at 18:57
    
I only suggest it since you'd be able to reduce the code from about 30 lines to 2 :-) –  irrelephant Oct 6 '12 at 19:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are missing break statements:

case 0: 
   answer = (arg1 * milligram) / milligram;
   break;
   ...
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Thanks, it worked. –  dead beef Oct 6 '12 at 18:52

rewrite every case like this

case 2: switch(arg3) { // if ounce
        case 0: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / milligram;break;
        case 1: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / gram;break;
        case 2: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / ounce;break;
        case 3: answer = (arg1 * ounce) / pound;break;
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Nested case statements are pretty hard to read, and tough to debug. It'd be a better idea to encapsulate the functionality you need into a method call instead.

That being said, there's no break statement anywhere in your switch. Regardless of the case, it will fall through to the last case (setting answer equal to the bottom of the case).

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You should be using break in switch statements,else your result may get detoriated

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Other than using break, using return statements does the trick as well as it also prevents falling through cases.

case 2: switch(arg3) { // if ounce
    case 0: return (arg1 * milligram) / milligram;
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