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I receive list like this

selection= [u'pSphereShape1', u'mesh', u'pSphereShape2', u'mesh', u'nurbsCircleShape1', u'nurbsCurve']

so myDic(selection)

def myDic(self,selObjects):
    print "Recieved ",selObjects
    print "Length ", len(selObjects)
    self.objDic={}
    for index,each in enumerate(reversed(selObjects)):

        print index,each
        if index%2==0:
            key=each
        elif index % 2!=0:
            value=each
            self.objDic[key]=value
            #self.objDic.update({key:value})
        print "Yo",self.objDic, len(self.objDic)

this does add values but after the first entry the next one overwrites the existing first entry...and total item in dictionary comes out to be only one and that is is the first entry...

how should I fill the dictionary so that each shape node like pSphereShape1 or pSphereShape1 becomes key and mesh or mesh becomes its value respectively...

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4 Answers 4

the self.objdict is not well placed, doing as here might work:

def myDic(self,selObjects):
    print "Recieved ",selObjects
    print "Length ", len(selObjects)
    self.objDic={} # dict mus be over here or else it is overwrited to empty in every loop
    for index,each in enumerate(reversed(selObjects)):
        print index,each
        if index%2==0:
            key=each
        elif index % 2!=0:
            value=each
            self.objDic[key]=value
            #self.objDic.update({key:value})
        print "Yo",self.objDic, len(self.objDic)
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1  
wow was I blind, anyway if you tried to run , i noticed it prints 1 key, value pair less, so in above example their should be 3 dictionary items but it turns out to be 2... –  user1176501 Oct 6 '12 at 19:28

The main reason is that you're redefining self.objDict in every step, which erases all previous values. As a first step, try moving that definition above the for loop.

Not sure which version on Python you are using, but you could also populate the dictionary using a comprehension (>= 2.7):

pairs = zip(selObjects[0::2], selObjects[1::2])
self.objDict = {k: v for pair in pairs}

Apologies if this doesn't work - I can't test it at the moment :) The idea is to create a list of tuples that contain the key and value for your dict, and then create the dictionary from that.

In Python < 2.6, this should work (using pairs from above):

self.objDict = dict((k, v) for pair in pairs)
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

allright fixed it myself, actually when I was checking with the modulus operation key was supposed to be where value is

def myDic(self,selObjects):
        print "Recieved ",selObjects
        print "Length ", len(selObjects)
        #self.objDic={}
        for index,each in enumerate(reversed(selObjects)):
            ##print index,each
            if index%2==0:
                value=each
            elif index % 2!=0:
                key=each
                self.objDic[key]=value
                #self.objDic.update({key:value})
        print self.objDic, len(self.objDic)

this code above generates key value pair out of list...

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Use this; it works.

def funct(selObjects):
    print "Recieved ",selObjects
    print "Length ", len(selObjects)
    self.objDic={}

    for index,each in enumerate((selObjects)):
        print index,each
        if index%2==0:
            key=each
        elif index % 2!=0:
            value=each
            objDic[key]=value
        #self.objDic.update({key:value})
        print "Yo",objDic, len(objDic)
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