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This is for a homework assignment. Normally I would use cron to do something like this, but teacher wants us to create a task queue that polls a server for information on a regular interval.

So far I have something like this:

Queue queue = QueueFactory.getDefaultQueue();
queue.add(
    withUrl("/MyPage").
    method(Method.GET).
    param("user", viewModel.getUserId()));

But this only runs once. How can I get it to repeat indefinitely?

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@Gwyn Howell I said specifically that I am NOT using cron. I am asking how to make a queue repeat. –  ConditionRacer Oct 6 '12 at 19:53
    
apologies. have you seen the deferred library? developers.google.com/appengine/articles/deferred –  Gwyn Howell Oct 8 '12 at 9:43
    
I took a quick look. It appears to be a higher abstraction of the task queue, is that right? –  ConditionRacer Oct 8 '12 at 14:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could make the code that runs in the task add another task to the queue

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Good idea, I think this is the way to go. Thanks! –  ConditionRacer Oct 6 '12 at 20:38

You can do it with not a very graceful way. If your task fails with RuntimeException it will be restarted automatically. You can use config to manage how offen do you want it to be repeated. Check https://developers.google.com/appengine/docs/java/config/queue for details. And it is important not use default queue, because you will need additional parameters.

It is not a natural way to schedule tasks, but it will work for you.

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Hmm, so there is no non-hacky way to make a task repeat? –  ConditionRacer Oct 6 '12 at 20:00
    
It is not a hacky way. But it is not a regular restart. It will be easy if you will use DefferedTask to throw Exception, but you can return HTTP code other than 200 for your "/MyPage" –  Kirill Lebedev Oct 6 '12 at 20:01
1  
Well I guess our definition of hacky is not the same ;) Throwing an exception when everything completed successfully does not seem like good practice to me. –  ConditionRacer Oct 6 '12 at 20:04

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