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I am using Solverstudio (with the Pulp solver) and i am trying to get a 2D output (onto a spreadsheet) from a 3D variable that has been found, for certain values of that variable.

Ive tried:

for (m,c,t) in mct:                 
 if Ymct[m][c][t].varValue>0:
  Schedule[m,t]=[c]

But since there's more than 1 c value for some m,t combinations, it doesnt work. I would like to have all the c values listed for the m,t combination.

Please help?

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1 Answer 1

Use collections.defaultdict as Schedule, you can simply add cs to the list by:

from collections import defaultdict

schedule = defaultdict(list)
for (m,c,t) in mct:
    if Ymct[m][c][t].varValue>0:
    schedule[(m,t)].extend([c])

(As an aside, you should name your variables properly according to PEP8. Specifically, use under_store for variable names and function names, and CapWords for class names)


Update:

To write a defaultdict to csv, you can consider the following approach: import csv

from collections import defaultdict

schedule = defaultdict(list)
schedule[1, 1] = [2, 3, 4]
schedule[1, 2] = [3, 4, 5]
schedule[1, 3] = [4, 5, 6]
schedule[1, 4] = [5, 6, 7]

with open("data.csv", "wb") as f:
    csv.writer(f).writerows([k, ] + v for k, v in schedule.iteritems())

Alternatively, I am wondering if LpVariable.varValue can return lists. And if so, the follwoing changes should work:

#schedule=defaultdict(list)
schedule = LpVariable.dicts("schedule", (moderator, time))

# ... many lines ...

for (m,c,t) in mct:
    if Ymct[m][c][t].varValue>0:
        #schedule[(m,t)].extend([c])
        schedule.setdefault(m, {}).setdefault(t, []).append(c)

# List entries in model output area
for (m,t) in mt:
    if len(schedule[(m,t)])>0:
        print (m,t), schedule[m][t]
        #print (m,t), schedule[(m,t)]

# ... many lines ...

for (m,t) in mt:
    timetable[m,t]=schedule[m][t].varValue
    #timetable[m,t]=schedule[m,t].items()

You can read over the changed code here: http://pastebin.com/UCVjqRwQ

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the answer (and the advise). Im new to python since I am only using it this one time to solve a linear model in excel (with solverstudio, but using the ironpython solver). I now used: from collections import defaultdict schedule = defaultdict(list) for (m,c,t) in mct: if Ymct[m][c][t].varValue>0: schedule[(m,t)].extend([c]) for (m,t) in mt: if len(schedule[(m,t)])>0: print (m,t), schedule[(m,t)] –  Marilize van Buisbergen Oct 6 '12 at 21:16
    
Im not sure if i did something wrong, but it still wont allow me to add the list to a cell in my workbook (and it isnt added when i use this code). I have schedule[(m,t)] defined on a range on my spreadsheet, but nothing changes on it. Im actually not even sure whether solverstudio (with pulp) allows lists in cells :S I can at least get the answers in the model output section using the "print" command. It is better than nothing i suppose :D If you have any additional ideas of what i may have done wrong, please let me know –  Marilize van Buisbergen Oct 6 '12 at 21:16
    
@MarilizevanBuisbergen Without the code of how Schedule is used in the solver, I am afraid I won't be able to tell why it won't allow you to add the list to a cell.. –  Kay Zhu Oct 6 '12 at 22:02
    
its not used anywhere except at the end - its an empty table that is defined in the data of the model (using the add data option in solverstudio), and it has indexed rows (m) and columns (c). Its only function is to be filled in after the solution is found. –  Marilize van Buisbergen Oct 6 '12 at 23:44
    
@MarilizevanBuisbergen I am not sure if I understand that completely. But the code I posted is no longer the Schedule in your original code; it basically declares a new variable schedule and modifies this schedule variable only. It gets filled by if you aren't using it later there's no way cells would be filled with the data stored in schedule. –  Kay Zhu Oct 6 '12 at 23:48
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