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I need to download JSON and process it all in background in iOS5, so I don't freeze my main thread. I haven't had any success doing that.

Here is what I am doing:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0),^{

    NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:myURL];
    myData = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:url];

    [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(processTheData:)
                           withObject:myData
                        waitUntilDone:YES];
}); 

-(void)processTheData:(NSData *)data
{
    //Parse JSON here
}

In the above code, Once download is done, I process it on Main thrd. How can I run it on background when I know I got the data?

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Maybe remove the call to performSelectorOnMainThread and just process the data inside the asynchronous block? –  user529758 Oct 6 '12 at 19:49
    
How do I process it without knowing the data being downloaded is ready yet? –  SMA2012 Oct 6 '12 at 20:00
    
myData = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:url]; is synchronous - it returns only when the data is downloaded. –  user529758 Oct 6 '12 at 20:02
    
Oh it is? So, even though its running under dispatchQueue, it would still be blocking the main thread? no? –  SMA2012 Oct 6 '12 at 20:05
    
No. dispatch_async() is async hronous... –  user529758 Oct 6 '12 at 20:07

1 Answer 1

The typical pattern is:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0),^{

    NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:myURL];
    myData = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:url];

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        [self processTheData:myData];
    });
}); 

Or, assuming that processTheData doesn't do UI updates itself, but you want to do so when you're done, the typical approach is that you don't dispatch back to the main queue until you need to update the user interface:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0),^{

    NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:myURL];
    myData = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:url];

    [self processTheData:myData];

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        // code that updates UI goes here
    });
}); 

Finally, if you're doing a small number of invocations of the above code, that's fine, but if you're likely to be doing a lot of requests, you should be aware that many servers limit how many concurrent requests they'll accept from a given client. Even if the server doesn't, you really want to limit how many concurrent requests you make of your server anyway. You can do this easily if you use NSOperationQueue instead of GCD.

So, if you are doing multiple async requests, you probably want to do the following (using the second example as the model). First, before you start initiating the requests, you should create a NSOperationQueue object:

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSOperationQueue *queue;

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.queue = [[NSOperationQueue alloc] init];
    self.queue.maxConcurrentOperationCount = 4;
}

Then your code that has to do the individual async requests would then:

[self.queue addOperationWithBlock:^{

    NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:myURL];
    myData = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:url];

    [self processTheData:myData];

    [[NSOperationQueue mainQueue] addOperationWithBlock:{
        // code that updates UI goes here
    }];
}]; 
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