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Currently I have this line of code at the top of my master page

@{
    MyApp.Domain.Concrete.FullUserProfile fullUser = (MyApp.Domain.Concrete.FullUserProfile)HttpContext.Current.Session[Membership.GetUser().ProviderUserKey.ToString()];
}

This gets the user's profile information in the cache, but my question is will this always be available? What if the user is logged in for a long time or something. How do I make it so his or her information isn't stored in session it will retrieve it from database again? I have a hard time understanding because I don't know if all this code should be in the view, and if it is how u would call a method from the code behind in order to trigger the database call and saving to the cache. The reason I didn't want to put this in the controller it seemed repetitive.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do this:

@{
    MyApp.Domain.Concrete.FullUserProfile fullUser = null;
    if (Membership.GetUser() != null && Session[Membership.GetUser().ProviderUserKey.ToString()] != null) {
        //Logged in
        fullUser = (MyApp.Domain.Concrete.FullUserProfile)HttpContext.Current.Session[Membership.GetUser().ProviderUserKey.ToString()];
    } else {
        //Not logged in logic
    }
}

Or you could try this, but I'm not entirely sure because I don't use the MembershipProvider system a lot:

if (Page.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
{
    //Logged in
}
else
{
    //Not logged in
}

But, if you're doing that you can just set the forms authentication required for whatever pages/directories you need them to be logged in your web.config.

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If you need to write code that will be used by several or all of your controllers and/or actions, you can create filters and write inside them the logic you need, lastly you just need to apply your filter at Controller or Action level.

For more info:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd410056(v=vs.90).aspx

Example:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
public class CustomFilter : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        // execution order: 1
        // your actions here
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        // execution order: 2
        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);
    }

    public override void OnResultExecuting(ResultExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        // execution order: 3
        base.OnResultExecuting(filterContext);
    }

    public override void OnResultExecuted(ResultExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        // execution order: 4
        base.OnResultExecuted(filterContext);
    }
}

Notice the execution order. The members of IActionFilter are executed before the action and after the action has returned an object inheriting from ActionResult (but the result has not been parsed yet, which means that the HTML has not been generated yet). At this point the members of IResultFilter are executed, before and after the ActionResult object generates the HTML

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You would usually have a ViewModel that contains the data of the user you need to display.

An action filter would fill the data, because you are worried about repetition

I would not store the user in session state. Its hard to keep it in sync. (session and authorization time out at different times)

To check for authorization you do not need to access the profile use:

HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated
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