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I'm searching for an algorithm to solve differences of the type ab-cd, where a, b, c, and d are integers at the edge of the type capacity, i.e. ab overflows or loses digits depending on the actual representation on the machine. I cannot use arbitrary precision math; one of the platforms will be a SQL database.

I consider something like decomposing the product into (a'+a'')b-(c'+c'')d and then somehow iterate the way down. But probably there is a much more efficient method or at least a clever idea how to do the decomposition. Unfortunately in most cases a,b; c,d; a,c; b,d are coprime, so reduction at least is not simple.

Any ideas?

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check out the GNU Multiple Precision functions. –  air4x Oct 6 '12 at 22:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The standard way I know of to address this type of issues is to do what humans do with numbers beyond one digit, which is the limit of our natural counting with fingers. We carry numbers forward.

For example, let's say the limit of numbers in your numeric calculator is 256 (2^8). To get the difference of (243*244)-(242*245), we would need to decompose the numbers into

Label | Part 1 (shifted 2 right) | Part 2 (remainder)
a       2                           43
b       2                           44
c       2                           42
d       2                           45

You'd need an array to store the individual digits of the result, or a string. I think an array is faster, but a string more convenient and visible (for debugging).

   (a*b)-(c*d)
=>   a1*b1 shift4 + a1*b2 shift2 + a2*b1 shift2 + a2*b2
   - c1*d1 shift4 + c1*d2 shift2 + c2*d1 shift2 + c2*d2
=> 987654321 (right-aligned string positioning)
  +    4xxxx
  +     88xx
  +     86xx
  +     1892
  -    4xxxx
  -     90xx
  -     84xx
  -     1890
  ==========
           2

A naive implementation would work through each step independently, pushing each digit into place and carrying it forward where necessary. There are probably tomes of literature about optimizing these algorithms, such as breaking this into array slots of 2 digits each (since your register of number-limit 256 can handle the addition of 2 2-digit numbers easily).

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After considering residual class maths I came down to a very similar solution. Just done testing, when I came back here and saw your proposal. The important part of course is having +4xxxx and -4xxxx in the same accumulator step, when it is not yet shifted left. As it seems, it can also be used to compare fractions, which reduce to the same float representation due to precision limits. –  Lars Hanke Oct 7 '12 at 19:21

WARNING

This method is only partially functional. There are cases that it can't solve.


Taken from your text:

I'm searching for an algorithm to solve differences of the type ab-cd, where a, b, c, and d are integers at the edge of the type capacity,

As I understand you want to calculate (a * b) - (c * d) avoiding a numeric overflow. And you want to solve this with an algorithm.

The first thing we need to recognize is that the result of (a * b) - (c * d) may not fit in the data type. I'll not try to solve those cases.

So, I'll search for different ways to calculate "ab-cd". What I've found is this:

(a * b) - (c * d) = ((a - c) * b) - (c * (d - b))

You can re-order the variables to get different products and therfore increasing the chance of finding a case that will allow you to calculate the operation without the dreaded numeric overflow:

((a - d) * b) - (d * (c - b))
((b - c) * a) - (c * (d - a))
((a - c) * b) - (c * (d - b))
((b - d) * c) - (b * (c - a))
((a - d) * c) - (a * (c - b))
((b - c) * d) - (b * (d - a))
((a - c) * d) - (a * (d - b))

Also notice that this are still differences of products, meaning that you can apply them recursively until you find one that works. For example:

    Starting with:
        (a * b) - (c * d)
    =>
    Using the transformation:
        ((a - d) * b) - (d * (c - b))
    =>
    By substitution:
        (e * b) - (d * f)
    =>
    Rinse an repeat:
        ((e - f) * b) - (f * (d - b))

Of course we need to make sure we aren't going to run into a numeric overflow by doing this. Thankfully it is also possible to test if a particular product will cause a numeric overflow (without actually doing the product) with the following approach:

        var max = MaxValue;
        var min = MinValue;
        if (a == 0 || b == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            var lim = a < 0 != b < 0 ? min : max;
            if ((a < 0 == b < 0) == a < 0)
            {
                return lim / a > b;
            }
            else
            {
                return lim / a < b;
            }
        }

Also, it is also possible to test if a particular difference will cause a numeric overflow (without actually doing the difference) with the following approach:

        var max = MaxValue;
        var min = MinValue;
        if (a < 0 == b < 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            if (a < 0)
            {
                if (b > 0)
                {
                    return min + b < a;
                }
                else
                {
                    return min - b < a;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                if (b > 0)
                {
                    return max - b > a;
                }
                else
                {
                    return max + b > a;
                }
            }
        }

With that it is possible to pick an expression from the eight above that will allow you to calculate without the numeric overflow.

But... Sometimes none of those works. And it seems to be that there are cases where not even their combinations works (ie. rinse and repeat dosn't work)*. Maybe there are other identities that can complete the picture.

*: I did try using some heuristic to explore the combinations and also did try random exploration, there is the risk that I didn't pick good heuristics and I didn't have "luck" with the random. That's why I can't tell for sure.

I want to think that I've done some progress... But with respect to the original problem I've ultimately failed. May be I'll get back to this problem when I have more time... or may be I'll just play video games.

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+1: excellent analysis –  wallyk Oct 6 '12 at 22:33
1  
That's wrong, unfortunately. Try e.g. a = 7, b = 15, c = 3, d = 4; a*b - c*d = 105 - 12 = 93; (a - c*d)*(b - c*d) = (7 - 12)*(15 - 12) = (-5)*3 = -15; (a - c)*(a - d)*(b - c)*(b - d) = 4*3*12*11 = 1584. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 6 '12 at 22:53
    
-1, x = (a - c) * (a - d) * (b - c) * (b - d) is wrong. Take a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4. The original formula gives -10, while yours gives 12. I don't know what you used, but that is not distributivity. –  IVlad Oct 6 '12 at 22:53
    
Thanks. I'll be fixing it. I was setting an enviroment to test this, and in fact I found it wrong. –  Theraot Oct 6 '12 at 23:02
    
Yes, this is about the algorithm I was considering. After an analysis of some expressions I found that usually a > b > c > d (for absolute values) and that a-d ~ a. Probably terms like a-nd ~ d might help. I'll see what I may find. –  Lars Hanke Oct 7 '12 at 12:16

If your products are near the limits of Int32 you can use Int64.

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You can use BC Math Functions to work with large number which on both 32 bit & 64 bit systems

Example Of Large Numbers

$a = "4543534543543534543543543543545";
$b = "9354354546546756765756765767676";
$c = "5654656565656556565654656565656";
$d = "4556565656546546546546546356435" ;


var_dump(calculate($a, $b, $c, $d));

Output

string '257010385579862137851193415136408786476450997824338960635377204776397393100227657735978132009487561885957134796870587800' (length=120)

Function Used

function calculate($a, $b, $c, $d) 
{
    return bcmul(bcmul(bcmul(bcsub($a, $c),bcsub($a, $d)),bcsub($b, $c)),bcsub($b, $d));
}
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After playing a little bit more I found a simpler algorithm following my original idea. It may be somewhat slower than the combined multiplication because it requires real multiplication and division instead of only shifts and addition, but I didn't benchmark it so far concerning the performance in an abstract language.

The idea is the following rewrite ab-cd = (a'+q*d)b-cd = a'b-(c-qb)d = a'b-c'd

The algorithm seems to convert the fastest if you order ab-cd as a>b and c>d, i.e. reduce the biggest numbers and maximize q.

q=(int)floor((a>c)? a/d : c/b);
a -= q*d;
c -= q*b;

Now reorder and start again. You can finish as soon as all numbers are small enough for safe multiplication, any number becomes smaller than 2 or even negative, or you find the same value for any of the numbers on both sides.

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