Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I send an email to a user's email address with a link to a password reset page, how do I authenticate the link? Should I store some randomly generated key in my database, and then add then to the link string? www.mydomain.com/passwordreset.html?key=abcd1234zz235 Then check this key against the stored key in the database?

If this is indeed the right approach, should I create some separate table to store these keys with their corresponding email? And if the answer to that is yes, then should I delete these keys after the user has reset their password to save space in my database?

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Something I didn't see in any of the answers below is that you should not store the access key in plain text in the database. It should have exactly the same security as the user's actual password because it essentially is a password, which means you need to hash it with a secure hashing function (e.g. bcrypt). You will then have to send the user ID along with the access key to the user and store the ID and the hashed access key in the database. –  Mike Oct 7 '12 at 0:45

4 Answers 4

That is a pretty typical way of handling it. I usually will add a PasswordResetKey field to my user table.

share|improve this answer
    
and how do you handle a request for a password reset where the email address has not even been registered with xyz service? –  Apollo Oct 6 '12 at 23:45
    
@Derek what do you mean? I don't think your question is clear. –  Mahn Oct 6 '12 at 23:47
    
If a user decides to reset the password for the address adfjal;sfsadfasjfkl;safj;lkjsfl;ksajf;@gmail.com, most likely this address does not exist. If nobody owns the address and this email address is not associated with an account for my service, how should I handle this. –  Apollo Oct 6 '12 at 23:51
    
@Derek tell the user "reset link was sent to your email address" but don't actually do anything if the email address/user is not found. –  Mahn Oct 6 '12 at 23:55
    
@Mahn ok great, that is what I thought would be proper practice... –  Apollo Oct 6 '12 at 23:57

should I create some separate table to store these keys with their corresponding email?

Yes, I would do that.

And if the answer to that is yes, then should I delete these keys after the user has reset their password to save space in my database?

Not because of space but because the transaction has been finished.

You can not save space here btw. because you should keep a log entry of the password change event in the audit log.

share|improve this answer
    
So I should not delete the records? Should I have each key-email pair timeout after a certain period, but keep the record? In other words, in my activation page, say www.mydomain.com/resetPassword.html I get the current time and only validate the reset if the creationDate of the key-email pair was x number of hours ago? –  Apollo Oct 6 '12 at 23:54
    
@Derek I'd just store the active key and once it's used move it from the table to your logs, wherever you store them. –  Mahn Oct 7 '12 at 0:11
    
@Mahn ok that makes sense. And finally, is it safe to send the user's email over email. So domain.com/…`ksaf so that I can reference the email to key with the information stored in the database in reset.php –  Apollo Oct 7 '12 at 0:14
    
@Derek: You delete, because the transaction has been finished - as written in the answer. And yes, you should add a time column and expire the password reset action when it is unfinished after a certain period of time. E.g. run a janitor job via cron and expire all password resets older than 48 hours. Tell your users that the password reset is valid for 24 hours. –  hakre Oct 7 '12 at 0:20
    
@hakre i think an easier way would be to store the creation date of the email-key pair, and whenever the activate.php link is pressed, it checks the current time with the creation time. If it's been more than 24 hours, re-direct to an error page. –  Apollo Oct 7 '12 at 0:23

Yes, that would work. Personally I like to have the key be an encoded string based on their user data that I can then decode. For instance, I might take the string userid|password_hash|emailaddress, encode it and send it. Then, when receiving it, I can decode it and split the parts out. The User ID is used to search the database, and then the password_hash and email are verified and if it all checks out then I can continue.

That said, your solution is probably better because it means you know whether or not the reset was actually requested. Ultimately all that matters is that it's made hard to just guess.

share|improve this answer
2  
That is terrible advice. If you include this kind of sensitive information in the link, and allow anyone to follow it whether a password reset was requested or not, you have coded yourself a big fat security problem. You are sending enough information around (unencrypted, mind you) for someone to take over that account. –  tdammers Oct 6 '12 at 23:38
    
and how do you handle a request for a password reset where the email address has not even been registered with xyz service? –  Apollo Oct 6 '12 at 23:40
    
I specifically said I encode it. –  Niet the Dark Absol Oct 6 '12 at 23:41
    
Yes. You said "encode". Not "encrypt". I hope you know the difference. –  tdammers Oct 6 '12 at 23:45
2  
It's definitely a better idea to use a random token, store it and discard it once used. –  Mahn Oct 6 '12 at 23:51

Take a look at this link, which might help you. Basically you have to create a table for password reset requests and generate a key which will identify the user, and the reset request itself.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.