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I've been working on this remove method for quite a while now and it almost works perfectly. I tell it to delete an element at a certain index, then I print out the list after the removal to show that the element, was in fact, deleted. However, take a look at what my main class prints out below. The element that was deleted pops back up again, then disappears again.

Here is my user-defined Doubly Linked List class:

package week6;

import java.util.Iterator;

public class DblLinkedList<E>
{
   private LinkEntry<E> head = null;
   private LinkEntry<E> tail = null;
   private int size = 0;

   public DblLinkedList()
   {
      head = tail = null;
   }

   public boolean is_empty()
   {
      if (head == null) 
          return true;
      return false;
   }

   public int size()
   {
       int count = 0;
       for (LinkEntry<E> current = head; current != null; current = current.next)
           count++;
       return count;
   }

   public boolean add(E e)
   {   
      LinkEntry<E> new_element = new LinkEntry<E>();
      new_element.element = e;

          if (head == null)
          {
              new_element.next = head;
              head = new_element;
              tail = head;
          }
          else
          {
              tail.next = new_element;
              new_element.previous = tail;
              tail = new_element;
          }
          return true;
   }

   public void remove(int n)
   {
       LinkEntry<E> remove_this = new LinkEntry<E>();

       boolean removed = false;
       int i = 0;
       remove_this = head;

       while (removed == false)
       {
           //if nothing comes before remove_this, set the head to equal the element after remove_this
           if (remove_this.previous == null)
           {
               head = remove_this.next;
               removed = true;
        }
           //if nothing comes after remove_this, set the tail equal to the element before remove_this
           else if (remove_this.next == null)
           {
               tail = remove_this.previous;
               tail.next = null;
               removed = true;
           }
           else
           {
               //if i == n, stop and delete 'remove_this' from the list
               if (i == n)
               {               
                   //set the previous element's next to the element that comes after remove_this
                   remove_this.previous.next = remove_this.next;
                   //set the element after remove_this' previous pointer to the element before remove_this
                   remove_this.next.previous = remove_this.previous;
                   removed = true;
               }
               else
               {
                   //if i != n, keep iterating through the list
                   remove_this = remove_this.next;
                   i++;
               }
           }
       }
    }

   /*
    * Print the doubly linked list starting at the beginning.
    */
   public void print_from_beginning()
   {
      LinkEntry<E> current = new LinkEntry<E>();
      for (current = head; current != null; current = current.next)
      {
          System.out.print(current.element + " ");
      }
   }

   /*
    * Print the doubly linked list starting the end.
    */
   public void print_from_end()
   {
      LinkEntry<E> current = new LinkEntry<E>();
      for (current = tail; current != null; current = current.previous)
      {
          System.out.print(current.element + " ");
      }
   }

   /* ------------------------------------------------------------------- */
   /* Inner classes                                                      */
   protected class LinkEntry<E>
   {
      protected E element;
      protected LinkEntry<E> next;
      protected LinkEntry<E> previous;

      protected LinkEntry() { element = null; next = previous = null; }
   }
   /* ------------------------------------------------------------------- */
   protected class DblLinkedListImplIterate<E> implements Iterator<E>
   {

       protected LinkEntry<E> next;

       protected DblLinkedListImplIterate()
       {
           next = (LinkEntry<E>) head;
       }

      @Override
      public boolean hasNext() {
          // TODO Auto-generated method stub
          return false;
      }

      @Override
      public E next() {
          // TODO Auto-generated method stub
          return null;
      }

      @Override
      public void remove() {
          // TODO Auto-generated method stub    
      }

   }
}

Here is my main class where I test my methods:

package week6;

public class App {

    public static <E> void main(String[] args) {

        DblLinkedList<String> list = new DblLinkedList<String>();

        list.add("Bill");
        list.add("Rohan");
        list.add("James");
        list.add("Krishna");
        list.add("Javier");
        list.add("Lisa");

        System.out.println("List size after all names are added: " + list.size());

        //a. Print the linked list starting at the beginning.
        System.out.println("\nPrint the linked list starting at the beginning:");
        list.print_from_beginning();
        System.out.println();

        //b. Print the linked list starting at the end.
        System.out.println("\nPrint the linked list starting at the end:");
        list.print_from_end();
        System.out.println();

        //c. Remove Bill and print the linked list starting from beginning.
        System.out.println("\nRemove Bill and print the linked list starting from beginning:");
        list.remove(0);
        list.print_from_beginning();
        System.out.println();

        //d. Remove Lisa and print the linked list starting from end.
        System.out.println("\nRemove Lisa and print the linked list starting from end:");
        list.remove(5);
        list.print_from_end();
        System.out.println();

        //e. Remove Krishna and print the linked list starting from the beginning.
        System.out.println("\nRemove Krishna and print the linked list starting from the beginning:");
        list.remove(2);
        list.print_from_beginning();
        System.out.println();

        System.out.println("\nList size: " + list.size());
    }
}

And here is what it prints out:

List size after all names are added: 6

Print the linked list starting at the beginning:
Bill Rohan James Krishna Javier Lisa 

Print the linked list starting at the end:
Lisa Javier Krishna James Rohan Bill 

Remove Bill and print the linked list starting from beginning:
Rohan James Krishna Javier Lisa 

Remove Lisa and print the linked list starting from end:
Javier Krishna James Rohan Bill 

Remove Krishna and print the linked list starting from the beginning:
Rohan James Javier 

List size: 3

Notice that Bill, that little shit, came back after I removed Lisa, then disappeared again at the very end. What is causing that? I want to assume it has something to do with my print_from_end method, but I can't be sure.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by seh, kleopatra, Jonathan Spooner, ChrisF, RichardTheKiwi Oct 7 '12 at 11:27

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If you remove the last element of a list, make sure you update the tail pointer, otherwise your backwards traversal will start exactly where it would have before you removed the last element. –  Edwin Buck Oct 9 '12 at 15:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add head.previous = null; in your remove method as below:

   public void remove(int n)
   {
       LinkEntry<E> remove_this = new LinkEntry<E>();
      //if remove_this is located in the middle of the list, enter this loop until it is
       //found, then remove it, closing the gap afterwards.
       int i = 0;
       boolean removed = false;
       remove_this = head;

       while(removed == false){
           //if nothing comes before remove_this, set the head to equal the element after remove_this
           if (remove_this.previous == null){
               head = remove_this.next;
               head.previous = null;
               removed = true;
           }

           //if nothing comes after remove_this, set the tail equal to the element before remove_this
           else if (remove_this.next == null){
               tail = remove_this.previous;
               tail.next = null;
               removed = true;
           }
           //otherwise set the next element's previous pointer to the element before remove_this
           else{
               //if i == n, stop and delete 'remove_this' from the list
               if (i == n) {               
                   //set the previous element's next to the element that comes after remove_this
                   remove_this.previous.next = remove_this.next;
                   //set the element after remove_this' previous pointer to the element before remove_this
                   remove_this.next.previous = remove_this.previous;
                   removed = true;
                   break;
               }
               //if i != n, keep iterating through the list
           }
           if(!removed){
               remove_this = remove_this.next;
           }
           i++; 
       }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
that did it! such a simple fix. thanks again. –  Brian Oct 7 '12 at 7:48

Your remove1 seems to fail because the constructor sets heads and tails to null, so then everything is null. When do head and tail have data in them, is there other code you are using that populates these?

In remove2 and remove 3, I see what you are trying to do with the remove, but should you assign remove_this.previous.next to remove_this.next? instead of remove_this.next.previous.

I would think that the previous link of the next element points right back to the remove_this element you are removing.

If I have element 1, element 2, element 3 pointing together and I want to remove element 2, then I would want to make element 1 point to element 3.

So if I'm sitting on element 2 and my next is 3, I want to set the next of element 1 to be element 3. If you say set element 1's next to element 2's next element's previous, it seems like that would be pointing right back to element 2.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was able to get the remove2() working, but only for middle elements. If it is first or last in the list, the remove method still isn't working. I think I should be able to figure it out though. –  Brian Oct 7 '12 at 2:51
    
Maybe update your remove method to check that the next or previous node exists before you set it, so if it's not null, then set it. You can't call a previous.next if the previous element is null. I'm just thinking you may be calling the .next or .previous on a null element when it's first or last. –  Logan Oct 7 '12 at 2:55
    
I've edited the method to check to see if the head or tail element is null, but now when I run my program, all the elements are being removed. I've updated the post with my current remove(int n). –  Brian Oct 7 '12 at 3:19
    
The problem seems to be that you have multiple lists in play here. When i debug it, your App list, wants to remove Bill, but when I step into the remove statement, the head list there still contains bill and removes it from there. So you need to make sure that you are only using 1 list between the classes. Maybe make a constructor in App to pass in your "list" object to start with it there, or get the List from your Double Linked List class and add your elements to it before using remove. –  Logan Oct 7 '12 at 14:40

I suggest that in each remove method you refactor the code so that you first find the nth element and then change its previous.next, its following.previous, head and tail references as necessary. You're combining the two steps and the added complexity is tripping you up.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you take a look at my code again? I've updated it, and while it makes logical sense to me, it won't remove the first or last element in the list. Any idea why? –  Brian Oct 7 '12 at 4:22
    
Because there is special case logic for the first and last (head and tail) element that you've got missing. –  Chris Gerken Oct 7 '12 at 4:29

You make two distinct errors in all three methods:

  1. in remove1, there is no logic to remove the correct LinkEntry. You just loop across all entries and perform your actions. Note that remove_this.element = n; has no effect because you overwrite it immediately after, with remove_this = head;

  2. in remove2 and remove3, there are two errors each:

    • remove_this.previous.next = remove_this.next.previous is wrong; you should separately set remove_this.previous.next to remove_this.next, and remove_this.next.previous to remove_this.previous.
    • you set remove_this = null, therefore at the next iteration you will receive a NullPointerException when accessing remove_this.next. You should break; out of the loop as soon as you have deleted the proper LinkEntry.

After your update, I wonder how the deletion can work at all; there is a number of important flaws in the algorithm.

  • At the beginning of the method, remove_this is created from scratch; that means that its attributes will have the default values left there by the constructor. If that constructor, as I suppose, sets both .previous and .next to null, then the first if will always be true, defeating the purpose of the whole method.

  • Same thing for the second if (even if it will never have a chance to execute because of the previous bug).

  • You should, instead, handle the special cases (list head and list tail) inside the loop, by properly testing if remove_this.previous or remove_this.next are null, before accessing them. Specifically, remove_this.previous will be null for the list head, and remove_this.next will be null for the list tail.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was able to get the remove2() working, but only for elements that weren't the first or last in the list. –  Brian Oct 7 '12 at 2:50
    
Can you take a look at my code again? It makes complete logical sense to me, but it still won't remove the first or last element. –  Brian Oct 7 '12 at 4:22
    
@Brian Please see my updated answer. –  Marco Leogrande Oct 7 '12 at 5:18
    
I've updated my code. My remove method appears to be perfect, but there is a bug in it somewhere. I've changed my question, as well as added all my code. Any idea what's causing the element to return then disappear again? –  Brian Oct 7 '12 at 6:28

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