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While learning a bit about , I come to see four types of ways of working with if statements:

  • Single Parenthesis - ( ... )
  • Double Parenthesis - (( ... ))
  • Single Square Bracket - [ ... ]
  • Double Square Brackets - [[ ... ]]

What is the difference between Parenthesis and Square Brackets in bash.

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up vote 34 down vote accepted

The tests you had listed :

  • Single Parenthesis - ( ... ) is creating a subshell
  • Double Parenthesis - (( ... )) is for arithmetic operation
  • Single Square Bracket - [ ... ] is the syntax for the POSIX test
  • Double Square Brackets - [[ ... ]] is the syntax for bash conditional expressions (similar to test but more powerful)

are not exhaustive, you can use boolean logic

if command; then ...

too, because the commands have exit status. In bash, 0 is true and > 0 is false.

You can see the exit status like this :

command
echo $?

See :

http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/basicgrammar
http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/arith_expr
http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashGuide/TestsAndConditionals

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3  
$? is not exactly the return value, it actually is the exit status; 0 is meant for success and 1 for failure, which you can interpret as true and false. – Edouard Thiel Mar 17 '13 at 13:08
    
Substitued "return value" by "exit status", right, but failure is not only 1 but all status > 0 as written in my post. – Gilles Quenot Mar 17 '13 at 13:43
    
Ex : curl /dev/null exit with 3 – Gilles Quenot Mar 17 '13 at 13:49
    
for sure, you are right. – Edouard Thiel Mar 17 '13 at 13:54
    
@sputnick Actually, failure is all status != 0 -- negative exit values are possible as well. – twalberg Jun 5 '13 at 21:12

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