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I have a very strange array sorting related problem in PHP that is driving me completely crazy. I have googled for hours, and still NOTHING indicates that other people have this problem, or that this should happen to begin with, so a solution to this mystery would be GREATLY appreciated!

To describe the problem/question in as few words as possible: When sorting an array based on values inside a multiple levels deeply nested array, using a foreach loop, the resulting array sort order reverts as soon as execution leaves the loop, even though it works fine inside the loop. Why is this, and how do I work around it?

Here is sample code for my problem, which should hopefully be a little more clear than the sentence above:

$top_level_array = array('key_1' => array('sub_array' => array('sub_sub_array_1' => array(1),
                                                               'sub_sub_array_2' => array(3),
                                                               'sub_sub_array_3' => array(2)
                                                              )
                                         )
                        );

function mycmp($arr_1, $arr_2)
{
    if ($arr_1[0] == $arr_2[0])
    {
        return 0;
    }
    return ($arr_1[0] < $arr_2[0]) ? -1 : 1;
}

foreach($top_level_array as $current_top_level_member)
{
    //This loop will only have one iteration, but never mind that...
    print("Inside loop before sort operation:\n\n");
    print_r($current_top_level_member['sub_array']);

    uasort($current_top_level_member['sub_array'], 'mycmp');

    print("\nInside loop after sort operation:\n\n");
    print_r($current_top_level_member['sub_array']);
}
print("\nOutside of loop (i.e. after all sort operations finished):\n\n");
print_r($top_level_array);

The output of this is as follows:

Inside loop before sort operation:

Array
(
    [sub_sub_array_1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1
        )

    [sub_sub_array_2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 3
        )

    [sub_sub_array_3] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2
        )

)

Inside loop after sort operation:

Array
(
    [sub_sub_array_1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1
        )

    [sub_sub_array_3] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2
        )

    [sub_sub_array_2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 3
        )

)

Outside of loop (i.e. after all sort operations finished):

Array
(
    [key_1] => Array
        (
            [sub_array] => Array
                (
                    [sub_sub_array_1] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => 1
                        )

                    [sub_sub_array_2] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => 3
                        )

                    [sub_sub_array_3] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => 2
                        )

                )

        )

)

As you can see, the sort order is "wrong" (i.e. not ordered by the desired value in the innermost array) before the sort operation inside the loop (as expected), then is becomes "correct" after the sort operation inside the loop (as expected).

So far so good.

But THEN, once we're outside the loop again, all of a sudden the order has reverted to its original state, as if the sort loop didn't execute at all?!?

How come this happens, and how will I ever be able to sort this array in the desired way then?

I was under the impression that neither foreach loops nor the uasort() function operated on separate instances of the items in question (but rather on references, i.e. in place), but the result above seems to indicate otherwise? And if so, how will I ever be able to perform the desired sort operation?

(and WHY doesn't anyone else than me on the entire internet seem to have this problem?)

PS. Never mind the reason behind the design of the strange array to be sorted in this example, it is of course only a simplified PoC of a real problem in much more complex code.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is a misunderstanding of how PHP provides your "value" in the foreach construct.

foreach($top_level_array as $current_top_level_member)

The variable $current_top_level_member is a copy of the value in the array, not a reference to inside the $top_level_array. Therefore all your work happens on the copy and is discarded after the loop completes. (Actually it is in the $current_top_level_member variable, but $top_level_array never sees the changes.)

You want a reference instead:

foreach($top_level_array as $key => $value)
{
    $current_top_level_member =& $top_level_array[$key];

EDIT:

You can also use the foreach by reference notation (hat tip to air4x) to avoid the extra assignment. Note that if you are working with an array of Objects, they are already passed by reference.

foreach($top_level_array as &$current_top_level_member)

To answer you question as to why PHP defaults to a copy instead of a reference, it's simply because of the rules of the language. Scalar values and arrays are assigned by value, unless the & prefix is used, and objects are always assigned by reference (as of PHP 5). And that is likely due to a general consensus that it's generally better to work with copies of everything expect objects. BUT--it is not slow like you might expect. PHP uses a lazy copy called copy on write, where it is really a read-only reference. On the first write, the copy is made.

PHP uses a lazy-copy mechanism (also called copy-on-write) that does not actually create a copy of a variable until it is modified.

Source: http://www.thedeveloperday.com/php-lazy-copy/

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So it WAS that, thanks a lot for clearing this up! But why on earth would they use a copy as the default behavior, it's both slower and less intuitive (IMHO)?! Shouldn't the command be called "forCopyOfEach" then? :) Anyway, I've now received two answers here, out of which yours had the most detailed answer, but the other one had a more elegant solution code-wise, which one do I select as the answer? Are there any rules or recommendations from StackOverflow in situations like this? –  QuestionOverflow Oct 7 '12 at 23:09
    
@QuestionOverflow I knew of the foreach by reference syntax, but I neglected to include it as a short-hand notation after the explanation. I just added it with credit to air4x. Also I added some info about why the language does what it does by default. I hope this helps! –  jimp Oct 8 '12 at 2:20
    
@QuestionOverflow Also, when you have multiple correct answers, it is good to upvote those and then award the best answer (in your opinion, not everyone will necessarily agree) by marking it. Btw, welcome to StackOverflow! –  jimp Oct 8 '12 at 2:22
1  
Thanks for the additional info, now your answer is definitely the most complete one, so I just marked it as answer to this question. Sadly, I apparently don't have enough reputation to be allowed to "upvote" things, but I'll try to remember to do it later when I do. And finally, thanks for the welcome! :) –  QuestionOverflow Oct 8 '12 at 4:03
    
Thanks! ... And starting out can be a challenge, but you are almost there. You only need 2 more rep to vote up: stackoverflow.com/privileges/vote-up :) –  jimp Oct 8 '12 at 4:09
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You can add & before $current_top_level_member and use it as reference to the variable in the original array. Then you would be making changes to the original array.

foreach ($top_level_array as &$current_top_level_member) {
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for this elegant solution! But why on earth would they use a copy as the default behavior, it's both slower and less intuitive (IMHO)?! Shouldn't the command be called "forCopyOfEach" then? :) Anyway, I've now received two answers here, out of which yours had the most elegant solution code-wise, but the other one had a more detailed answer/explanation, which one do I select as the answer? Are there any rules or recommendations from StackOverflow in situations like this? –  QuestionOverflow Oct 7 '12 at 23:12
    
Making a copy allows you to work with it inside the foreach without worrying about changing the original array. Select the first answer if both are similar or the one which is most useful. Upvote the other answers you find useful. –  air4x Oct 8 '12 at 4:20
    
Thanks, I will upvote your answer as soon as I get enough reputation to be allowed to do so then! –  QuestionOverflow Oct 8 '12 at 10:52
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