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I am wondering WTF my while loop which calls istream& getline ( istream& is, string& str ); keeps reading the same line again. I have the following while loop (nested down several levels of other while loops and if statements) which calls getline, but my output statement which is the first code line in the while loop's block of code tells me it is reading the same line over and over again, which explains why my output file doesn't contain the right data when my program is finished.

while (getline(file_handle, buffer_str)) {
      cout<< buffer_str <<endl;
      cin.get();
      if ((buffer_str.find(';', 0) != string::npos) && (buffer_str.find('\"', 0) != string::npos)) { //we're now at the end of the 'exc' initialiation statement
         buffer_str.erase(buffer_str.size() - 2, 1);
         buffer_str += '\n';
         for (size_t i = 0; i < pos; i++) {
             buffer_str += ' ';
         }
         buffer_str += "throw(exc);\n";
         for (size_t i = 0; i < (pos - 3); i++) {
             buffer_str += ' ';
         }
         buffer_str += '}';
      }

      else if (buffer_str.find(search_str6, 0) != string::npos) { //we're now at the second problem line of the first case
         buffer_str += " {\n";
         output_str += buffer_str;
         output_str += '\n';
         getline(file_handle, buffer_str); //We're now at the beginning of the 'exc' initialiation statement
         output_str += buffer_str;
         output_str += '\n';

         while (getline(file_handle, buffer_str)) {
               if ((buffer_str.find(';', 0) != string::npos) && (buffer_str.find('\"', 0) != string::npos)) { //we're now at the end of the 'exc' initialiation statement
                 buffer_str.erase(buffer_str.size() - 2, 1);
                 buffer_str += '\n';
                 for (size_t i = 0; i < pos; i++) {
                     buffer_str += ' ';
                 }
                 buffer_str += "throw(exc);\n";
                 for (size_t i = 0; i < (pos - 3); i++) {
                     buffer_str += ' ';
                 }
                 buffer_str += '}';
               }

               output_str += buffer_str;
               output_str += '\n';

               if (buffer_str.find("return", 0) != string::npos) {
                  getline(file_handle, buffer_str);
                  output_str += buffer_str;
                  output_str += '\n';
                  about_to_break = true;
                  break; //out of this while loop
               }
         }
      }
      if (about_to_break) {
         break; //out of the level 3 while loop (execution then goes back up to beginning of level 2 while loop)
      }
      output_str += buffer_str;
      output_str += '\n';
}

Because of this problem, my if statement and then my else statement in my loop are not functioning as they should, and it doesn't break out of that loop when it should (though it eventually does break out of it, but I don't know exactly how yet).

Anyone have any idea what could be causing this problem??

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
At a quick glance, I would say that you are using buffers incorrectly, the point of a buffer is to copy it into some other result set. You have a while loop, inside a while loop, and you are doing a lot of string manipulation on buffer_str - this is really messy. You should probably try and simplify this. What exactly are u trying to do? –  FaddishWorm Oct 7 '12 at 3:26
    
Well, I admit I could have copied the content of buffer_str into another string, and then performed all of the operations on the other string, but I didn't really see a need to, since getline is supposed to replace the content of buffer_str each read operation anyway from what I understand about the function. As for a while loop within a while loop, why not? I'm doing that because I felt it would be best to step through the file, locating different sections and subsections of it at a time. Therefore, the highest level while loop locates the line containing the first line of a function... –  Jammanuser Oct 7 '12 at 3:37
    
...definition in the input C++ source file I read into the program. The next level while loop locates a switch statement, and so forth. That way, it was like zeroing in on the target, until finally I find the lines of code I actually wanted to change, and could do so. I realize that there are probably other ways of doing this, but this is the one I first thought of, and I didn't know when I first started how many different nested levels it would end up being. –  Jammanuser Oct 7 '12 at 3:41
    
As for what I'm trying to do, well I have a C++ source file that contained a pretty long function which was originally deemed as ok by me (since it compiled and ran ok), but then I decided to make a couple of changes in it, namely changing the type of the exceptions it can throw when an error occurs from const char* to std::string. But since its such a long function, I decided to write a program to do the hard work itself. Right now, the program is mostly working, i.e. it recreates the function with the necessary changes, only problem being it does a couple things wrong, like not adding a... –  Jammanuser Oct 7 '12 at 3:44
    
...a ending bracket after an if statement, and putting an extra newline in where there's not supposed to be one (still can't figure out that one...I don't see it in the code), and not adding a throw() statement after the exception string is initialized. –  Jammanuser Oct 7 '12 at 3:46
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