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What I have done is as below, but with this I am having a lot of problems while destructing the tree, and while trying to print the tree (basically anywhere I need to use recursion on the tree).

This is because while trying to call print recursively on the left of the right subtrees, my method breaks because my left and right subtrees are actually only Nodes and not Trees. So, I need to either typecase my Nodes to Trees or I need to create new trees, both of which are ugly solutions.

I think the problem here is with class design. Can you please comment on the same? Thanks!

class Node {
    int _data;
public:
    Node* left;       // left child
    Node* right;      // right child
    Node* p;          // parent
    Node(int data) {
        _data = data;
        left = NULL;
        right = NULL;
        p  = NULL;
    }
    ~Node() {
    }
    int d() {
        return _data;
    }
    void print() {
        std::cout << _data << std::endl;
    }
};

class Tree {
    Node* root;
public:
    Tree() {
        root = NULL;
    }
    Tree(Node* node) {
        root = node;
    }
    ~Tree() {
        delete root->left; // this is NOT RIGHT as
                           // it only deletes the node
                           // and not the whole left subtree
        delete root->right;
        delete root;
    }

    void print(int);
    void add(int);
};
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closed as not a real question by Mitch Wheat, nneonneo, Toon Krijthe, Sergey K., Tichodroma Oct 7 '12 at 9:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What is Node *p supposed to be? A node only has left and right children... –  nneonneo Oct 7 '12 at 5:06
    
What is Node::p? Edit: damn you nneonneo :P –  Rollie Oct 7 '12 at 5:07
    
p is the parent pointer. –  Moeb Oct 7 '12 at 5:07
    
Aah. Makes sense. (Probably should be called *parent though). –  nneonneo Oct 7 '12 at 5:08
1  
Check this implementation, the design is good I think. The destructors are missing there, you just have to do it in the way Rollie pointed in his answer –  José Manuel Oct 7 '12 at 5:25

3 Answers 3

Why don't you just allow Node to be your tree class? A non-empty node, by definition, is the root of some tree. This will substantially simplify your code since you don't need to make different cases for Tree and Node.

share|improve this answer
    
Because I wanted to create a generic Node structure that can be used not just for a tree, but for other data structures as well, for example, a linked list, and for tree to be composed of a set of nodes. –  Moeb Oct 7 '12 at 5:09
    
This does simplify the algorithm, but some concepts differ. For example, you would expect Tree::Print() to recursively print all nodes, but not Node::Print(), or keeping track of Node count need not be done in every Node if there is a Tree class wrapping everything. –  Rollie Oct 7 '12 at 5:11
1  
But your Node structures contain left and right pointers. They can't really be construed as generic! If you want, call them TreeNode. Realistically, TreeNode and ListNode should be different classes. –  nneonneo Oct 7 '12 at 5:12
    
@Rollie: Node would probably benefit from having a recursive printing function. It may also have a non-recursive printing function. The two need not be exclusive. Note too that having Nodes act like the root of their own tree allows you to examine subtrees in isolation easily, without having to copy their contents to a new Tree. –  nneonneo Oct 7 '12 at 5:14
    
@nneonneo of course that's true - it's just 2 ways of writing the same function. whether it's part of Node and explicitly PrintRecursive(), part of Tree as Print(), or just an algorithm Print(Node *, bool bRecursive = false). My statement is merely that there is some value in having the tree class; not that it's superior in all respects. The way OP is describing his Node class though, PrintRecursive() would not be implemented the same way if used in a List class. Re that - what would be the most optimal/elegant way to implement a Tree that can transform into a List? –  Rollie Oct 7 '12 at 5:22

Change the destructor for Node so that it deletes its left and right children. Then for your Tree destructor just delete root, so:

~Tree() {
   delete root;
}

~Node() {
   delete left;
   delete right;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Other choice is using smart pointers for memory handling, that way you can forget about the destructors, you just have to use std::unique_ptr<Node> instead of Node* in all the declarations. The exception would be the p (parent), it should still be Node* as you are not handling memory there, just pointing. –  José Manuel Oct 7 '12 at 5:36
    
I haven't used unique_ptr yet, but the doc I'm looking at suggests it's not copyable - this might make rebalancing more difficult. Maybe shared_ptr would be more appropriate? –  Rollie Oct 7 '12 at 5:40
    
shared_ptr introduces a certain risk of accidental cyclic references. You can still move unique_ptr, and its not a big deal. Just do target = std::move( source ); instead of target = source; (target and source would be of type std::unique_ptr<Node>). –  José Manuel Oct 7 '12 at 5:57
    
Seems plausible, if I'm understanding though: consider the case where you have a 3 node imbalanced tree (values 3, 2, 1, with 3 being root). Assuming Tree uses unique_ptr<Node> root;, to balance you would first have to Node2->right = move(root);, then root = move(Node3->left); - order seems like it suddenly matters a great deal, as doing the opposite order would delete Node3. Not an insurmountable issue, but a concern nonetheless. –  Rollie Oct 7 '12 at 6:19
public:
~Tree() {
        clear();
        delete root;
    }

    void clear()
    {
        recursive_delete(root);
    }
private:
    void recursive_delete(Node* node)
    {
        if (node!=NULL)
        {
            recursive_delete(node->left);
            recursive_delete(node->right);
            deleteNode(node);
        }
    }
    void deleteNode(Node* node)
    {
        delete node;
        node = NULL;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You are deleting root in ~Tree and in recursive_delete. –  OneOfOne Feb 16 at 1:42

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