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I have the following array below, doing an experiment on union operator.

$a = array(1,2,3,6);

$b = array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

$c =  $b + $a;

$c seems to be 1,2,3,4,5

Thus I assume array $b is check against array $a. 6 doesn't exist in $b, so it doesn't add to it.

Now, if I were to switch it to $c = $a + $b, I would expect (1,2,3,6) only.

However, the actual output is (1,2,3,6,5).

Can anyone explain this?

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1  
It's not terribly helpful in answering your problem, but I have to offer youtube.com/watch?v=kXEgk1Hdze0 for commiseration. – Adam Liss Oct 7 '12 at 5:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you misunderstood with how + operator works with array. When + is used for array it basically merges 2 arrays by keys not values

For example. I'll explain why $c has difference result than you expected.

# $a = array(1,2,3,6);
$a = array(
  0 => 1,
  1 => 2,
  2 => 3,
  3 => 6
);
# $b = array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
$b = array(
  0 => 1, 
  1 => 2, 
  2 => 3, 
  3 => 4, 
  4 => 5
);

// the + operator simply do this
$c[0] = $a[0] + $b[0]; // yield 1
...
...
$c[3] = $a[3] + $b[3]; // yield 6

$c; // yield array(1,2,3,6,5)
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I don't agree with @Rezigned as the above code gives following output $c[0] = $a[0] + $b[0]; // yield 2 $c[3] = $a[3] + $b[3]; // yield 10 which means it simply adds – dev_khan Jun 16 '15 at 11:52

Use + to append array, the process is checked by the key, not the value.

Different from array_merge, when you use +, the value in the second array will not overwrite the value in the first array with the same key.

So for $b + $a, no value in $b will be overwrite, so the result will still be array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

for $a + $b, the 1,2,3,6 will be reserved, and append the extra value 6, so the result will be array(1,2,3,6,5).

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The + takes the most left variable and uses all of its values first. If all of its values are used up but the amount of entries in the left one is less than the right one, it fills up the rest with the right one.

$foo = array("foo");
$boo = array(true, "bar");

$foobar = $foo + $boo;

First, $foobar is filled up with what's in $foo, but then, since the length of $boo is greater than $foo, $foobar is populated by $boo's values where $foo left off. So the first value is ignored because it was already used by $foo, but the second value hasn't been so it's merged.

This concept also applies when the array's keys are defined (i.e., $arr['location'] instead of $arr[]). The right's keys will not override the left's.

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Easiest way to explain $c = $a + $b.

$c first takes the "key value pairs" of (the first operand) $a.

If (the second operand) $b has more "key value pairs" than $a..

$c then adds the excess of $b to the end of the array.

Else, $c remains equivalent to $a.

$a =   
  0 => 2,
  1 => 5,
  2 => 8,

$b =   
  0 => 9,
  1 => 2,
  2 => 1,
  3 => 5,
  4 => 6,

$c =   
  0 => 2,
  1 => 5,
  2 => 8,
  3 => 5,  //From $b
  4 => 6,  //From $b
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