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I am developing a game, I would like to save the state of the objects in xml file. I don't have a schema for it. Say I have, Country has list of States objects and that has a list of cities objects. How can I generate an xml schema that saves their information?

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this should help (java.sys-con.com/node/37550) by the way, to avoid getting into troubles all seralizable classes to be properly created from XML should have an empty constructor –  user1406062 Oct 7 '12 at 5:22
    
Have a look at Java Architecture for XML Binding –  MadProgrammer Oct 7 '12 at 6:33
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See below example helps you,

  1. Main Class public class CreateXML {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            final JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(Country.class);
            final Marshaller marshaller = context.createMarshaller();
            // Create a stringWriter to hold the XML
            final StringWriter stringWriter = new StringWriter();
            CreateXML xml = new CreateXML();
            Country country = xml.createCountry();
            marshaller.marshal(country, stringWriter);
            // Print out the contents of the stringWriter
            System.out.println(stringWriter.toString());
        } catch (JAXBException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    private List<String> createCity(){
        List<String> cities = new ArrayList<String>();
        cities.add("Slough");
        cities.add("Manchestor");
        return cities;
    }
    private List<State> createState(){
        List<State> states = new ArrayList<State>();
        State state = new State();
        state.setStatName("London");
        state.setCityList(createCity());
        states.add(state);
        return states;
    }
    private Country createCountry(){
        Country country = new Country("UK", createState());
        return country;
    }
    

    }

2.Java Beans - Country

@XmlRootElement
public class Country {

    String countryName;
    List<State> states;
    public Country(String countryName, List<State> states) {
        this.countryName = countryName;
        this.states = states;
    }
    public Country() {
    }
    public String getCountryName() {
        return countryName;
    }
    public void setCountryName(String countryName) {
        this.countryName = countryName;
    }
    public List<State> getStates() {
        return states;
    }
    public void setStates(List<State> states) {
        this.states = states;
    }

}

3.Javabean State

String statName;
List<String> cityList;

public State() {
}
public String getStatName() {
    return statName;
}
public void setStatName(String statName) {
    this.statName = statName;
}
public List<String> getCityList() {
    return cityList;
}
public void setCityList(List<String> cityList) {
    this.cityList = cityList;
}
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Using XMLEncoder/Decoder we do not have to create a schema, but merely make the 'beans' in a particular form. E.G. A Citybean.

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class City {

    public String name;

    public City() {
    }

    public City(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Would have a public 'no arg's constructor and public getters and setters for all public attributes we wish to serialize. The State class would be similar.

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class State {

    public ArrayList<City> cities;
    public String name;

    public State() {
    }

    public State(String name) {
        this.setName(name);
    }

    public ArrayList<City> getCities() {
        return cities;
    }

    public void setCities(ArrayList<City> cities) {
        this.cities = cities;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Then we only need a short code to serialize the lot.

import java.awt.Desktop;
import java.beans.XMLEncoder;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class SerializeObject {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        ArrayList<State> states = new ArrayList<State>();
        State nsw = new State("New South Wales");
        states.add(nsw);
        ArrayList<City> nswCities = new ArrayList<City>();
        nswCities.add(new City("Sydney"));
        nswCities.add(new City("Wollongong"));
        nsw.setCities(nswCities);

        State qld = new State("Queensland");
        states.add(qld);
        ArrayList<City> qldCities = new ArrayList<City>();
        qldCities.add(new City("Brisbane"));
        qldCities.add(new City("Ipswich"));
        qld.setCities(qldCities);

        File f = new File("localities.xml");
        FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(f);
        XMLEncoder xmle = new XMLEncoder(fos);
        xmle.writeObject(states);
        xmle.close();

        Desktop.getDesktop().edit(f);
        System.out.println("Finished!");
    }
}

The resulting serialized file.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 
<java version="1.6.0" class="java.beans.XMLDecoder"> 
 <object class="java.util.ArrayList"> 
  <void method="add"> 
   <object class="State"> 
    <void property="cities"> 
     <object class="java.util.ArrayList"> 
      <void method="add"> 
       <object class="City"> 
        <void property="name"> 
         <string>Sydney</string> 
        </void> 
       </object> 
      </void> 
      <void method="add"> 
       <object class="City"> 
        <void property="name"> 
         <string>Wollongong</string> 
        </void> 
       </object> 
      </void> 
     </object> 
    </void> 
    <void property="name"> 
     <string>New South Wales</string> 
    </void> 
   </object> 
  </void> 
  <void method="add"> 
   <object class="State"> 
    <void property="cities"> 
     <object class="java.util.ArrayList"> 
      <void method="add"> 
       <object class="City"> 
        <void property="name"> 
         <string>Brisbane</string> 
        </void> 
       </object> 
      </void> 
      <void method="add"> 
       <object class="City"> 
        <void property="name"> 
         <string>Ipswich</string> 
        </void> 
       </object> 
      </void> 
     </object> 
    </void> 
    <void property="name"> 
     <string>Queensland</string> 
    </void> 
   </object> 
  </void> 
 </object> 
</java> 
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Actually ArrayList<State> states should probably be ArrayList<State> country, but hopefully you get the idea. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 7 '12 at 7:15
    
Thank you all, very useful. –  newbieLinuxCpp Oct 9 '12 at 2:24
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try with xstream http://xstream.codehaus.org/tutorial.html

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I found JAXB but I found it parse one class to one xml. but if I want to parse multiple objects (country, state, city) as a tree in one xml? I'm really confused. –  newbieLinuxCpp Oct 7 '12 at 5:21
    
@newbieLinuxCpp - The following will help you understand JAXB: wiki.eclipse.org/EclipseLink/Examples/MOXy/GettingStarted. Note: JAXB is a standard (JSR-222) and MOXy is one of the implementations. –  Blaise Doughan Oct 7 '12 at 10:58
    
@newbieLinuxCpp both xtream and jaxb will serialize objects using the class name as the enclosing tag. Also (if you read the link I posted) with xstream you can give alias to classes. That includes list and arrays of objects as well –  jorgeu Oct 8 '12 at 13:04
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