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I want to create a function object, which also has some properties held on it. For example in JavaScript I would do:

var f = function() { }
f.someValue = 3;

Now in TypeScript I can describe the type of this as:

var f: { (): any; someValue: number; };

However I can't actually build it, without requiring a cast. Such as:

var f: { (): any; someValue: number; } = <{ (): any; someValue: number; }>( function() { } );
f.someValue = 3;

How would you build this without a cast?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So if the requirement is to simply build and assign that function to "f" without a cast, here is a possible solution:

var f: { (): any; someValue: number; };

f = (() => {
    var _f : any = function () { };
    _f.someValue = 3;
    return _f;
})();

Essentially, it uses a self executing function literal to "construct" an object that will match that signature before the assignment is done. The only weirdness is that the inner declaration of the function needs to be of type 'any', otherwise the compiler cries that you're assigning to a property which does not exist on the object yet.

EDIT: Simplified the code a bit.

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The mentioned answers work and might be required in some situations, but have the downside of providing no type safety for building up the object. This technique will at least throw a type error if you attempt to add an undefined property.

interface F { (): any; someValue: number; }

var f = <F>function () { }
f.someValue = 3

// type error
f.notDeclard = 3
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As a shortcut, you can dynamically assign the object value using the ['property'] accessor:

var f = function() { }
f['someValue'] = 3;

This bypasses the type checking. However, it is pretty safe because you have to intentionally access the property the same way:

var val = f.someValue; // This won't work
var val = f['someValue']; // Yeah, I meant to do that

However, if you really want the type checking for the property value, this won't work.

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This departs from strong typing, but you can do

var f: any = function() { }
f.someValue = 3;

if you are trying to get around oppressive strong typing like I was when I found this question. Sadly this is a case TypeScript fails on perfectly valid JavaScript so you have to you tell TypeScript to back off.

"You JavaScript is perfectly valid TypeScript" evaluates to false. (Note: using 0.95)

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