Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find a way to iterate through an XML recordset containing a namespace. However, I don't know the field names in advance. Sample XML is below.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<string xmlns="http://www.site.com/SMART/Updates">
<NewDataSet>
    <record>
        <FIELD1>data1</FIELD1>
        <FIELD2>data2</FIELD2>
        <FIELD3>data3</FIELD3>
    </record>
    <record>
        <FIELD1>data1</FIELD1>
        <FIELD2>data2</FIELD2>
        <FIELD3>data3</FIELD3>
    </record>
</NewDataSet>

Again, I won't know the field names in advance. I need read the namespace, find the name of the root element ("NewDataSet", in this case) and then need to get the field names and values of the individual elements. I have tried to use $xml->getname(), and $xml->xpath('\') to find the root element name, but been unable to crack it.

share|improve this question
    
I added the PHP tag - hopefully this is correct :-) –  home Oct 7 '12 at 7:43
1  
You have posted invalid XML in your question. No standard conform XML parser can be used to answer your question in a predictable manner unless you fix the input XML. –  hakre Oct 16 '12 at 22:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

(as discussed in Chat)

Plain DOM functions are the best way to process XML.

Demo or code:

<?php
header('Content-Type: text/plain');
$xml = <<<END
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<string xmlns="http://www.site.com/SMART/Updates">
<NewDataSet>
    <record>
        <FIELD1>data1</FIELD1>
        <FIELD2>data2</FIELD2>
        <FIELD3>data3</FIELD3>
    </record>
    <record>
        <FIELD1>data1</FIELD1>
        <FIELD2>data2</FIELD2>
        <FIELD3>data3</FIELD3>
    </record>
</NewDataSet>
</string>
END;
$dom = new DOMDocument;
$dom->preserveWhiteSpace = false;
$dom->normalize();
$dom->loadXML($xml);
echo 'Root element name: ' . $dom->firstChild->firstChild->tagName . PHP_EOL;
echo 'Number of child elements: ' . count($dom->firstChild->firstChild->childNodes) . PHP_EOL;
echo '=====' . PHP_EOL . PHP_EOL;
echo print_node($dom->firstChild->firstChild);
function print_node($node, $level = 0, $prev_level = 0) {
    $result = '';
    if($node->hasChildNodes()) {
        foreach($node->childNodes as $subnode) {
            $result .= str_repeat('    ', $level) . $node->tagName . ' =>' . PHP_EOL;
            $result .= print_node($subnode, $level + 1, $level) . PHP_EOL;
        }
    } else {
        if(trim($node->nodeValue) !== '') {
            $result .= str_repeat('    ', $level) . '**Data: ' . trim($node->nodeValue) . PHP_EOL;
        }
    }
    return $result;
}
?>

Output:

Root element name: NewDataSet
Number of child elements: 1
=====

NewDataSet =>
    record =>
        FIELD1 =>
            **Data: data1


    record =>
        FIELD2 =>
            **Data: data2


    record =>
        FIELD3 =>
            **Data: data3



NewDataSet =>
    record =>
        FIELD1 =>
            **Data: data1


    record =>
        FIELD2 =>
            **Data: data2


    record =>
        FIELD3 =>
            **Data: data3
share|improve this answer
    
Why use DOM rather than SimpleXML? As the name suggests, it is very simple to use, and entirely adequate for the questioner's needs. –  IMSoP Oct 17 '12 at 17:15
    
@IMSoP When you need to do more advanced things with XML, you will end up having to switch to DOM anyway, and so it's better to start with DOM rather than have to rewrite the code later. See this. –  uınbɐɥs Oct 17 '12 at 20:20
    
So far, I've never needed to use anything other than SimpleXML to interact with XML APIs. The only two things I know that it makes fundamentally difficult/impossible are navigating upwards, and editing, but DOM is hardly a user-friendly way of writing an entire XML document, so I'm happy with that. Plus, you can mix and match DOM and SimpleXML code easily, as "importing" from one to the other is a cheap operation (it just re-wraps the memory structure). –  IMSoP Oct 18 '12 at 8:51
    
@IMSoP Everyone has their own preference, but this has solved their problem. Read through the chat messages. –  uınbɐɥs Oct 18 '12 at 19:17
    
I'm happy with personal preferences, but you described DOM as "the best way". I can't see anything on this page or the chat logs justifying the claim that SimpleXML is less suited to this task. –  IMSoP Oct 18 '12 at 19:32

You can traverse the XML document using JAXP APIs, you don't need to know the structure or node names in advance

InputStream is = new ByteArrayInputStream(xml.getBytes("UTF-8"));
Document doc = docBuilder.parse(is);
NodeList nodeList = doc.getChildNodes();

and you can iterate on document and get the nodes and attributes

for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.getLength(); i++) {
            Node node = nodeList.item(i);
            NamedNodeMap attributes = node.getAttributes();

//...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I am not seeing how we start getting the XML in. I am starting with a simpleXML object build from a string. I don't have to use XML, but how to I start out, with the XML string that I have? Sorr to be dull. –  Don Briggs Oct 7 '12 at 8:24
    
@Anshu I think you've misunderstood: this is a PHP question, your code appears to be Java or C++ or something. –  IMSoP Oct 17 '12 at 17:10
    
yes IMSoP, I understand it is Java, I missed the tag in the questino –  Anshu Oct 17 '12 at 18:47

Your XML is invalid, but assuming the string tag is closed after the </NewDataSet> tag:

You can get the namespaces declared in the document using getDocNamespaces().

$xml = simplexml_load_string($xmlfile);
$namespaces = $xml->getDocNamespaces(); //array of namespaces

$dataset = $xml->children(); //first child (NewDataSet)

echo $dataset->getName(); //NewDataSet

$records = $dataset->children();
$i = 0;
$result = array();
foreach ($records as $key => $value) {
    foreach ($value as $fieldName => $fieldData) {
        $result[$i][$fieldName] = (string)$fieldData;
    }
    $i++;
}
var_dump($result);

Now $result contains an array that is easier to read and contains the rows :

array(2) {
  [0]=> array(3) {
            ["FIELD1"]=> string(5) "data1"
            ["FIELD2"]=> string(5) "data2"
            ["FIELD3"]=> string(5) "data3"
        }
  [1]=>  array(3) {
            ["FIELD1"]=> string(5) "data1"
            ["FIELD2"]=> string(5) "data2"
            ["FIELD3"]=> string(5) "data3"
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the delay. Something is not rights. When I try to print the name of the root node ("echo $dataset->getName();"), I get an empty string. I am using WAMP. I think I have turned any extensions that I may need. But still, no luck. –  Don Briggs Oct 15 '12 at 21:00
1  
@DonBriggs The above works for me (as mentioned, your question is missing the </string> from the end of the XML). You could try using these debug functions to look at the SimpleXML object you're getting back at each stage: github.com/IMSoP/simplexml_debug –  IMSoP Oct 17 '12 at 17:12

Looking at the chat transcript posted in another answer, it looks like the element actually contains a string which is an escaped XML document. So there is exactly one element in the outer document, called <string>. It has no children, just content. (This looks remarkably like someone using ASP.net's service-builder.)

So the step you are missing is unescaping this inner XML to treat as a new XML document:

// Parse the outer XML, which is just one <string> node
$wrapper_sx = simplexml_load_string($wrapper_xml);
// Extract the actual XML inside it
$response_xml = (string)$wrapper_sx;
// Parse that
$response_sx = simplexml_load_string($response_xml);

// Now handle the XML
$tag_name = $response_sx->getName();
foreach ( $response_sx->children() as $child )
{
    // Etc
}

// see http://github.com/IMSoP/simplexml_debug
simplexml_tree($response_sx, true);
share|improve this answer

I don't actually understand what you problem is, in your said real-life XML you gave in PHP chat, there are no namespaces involved (and even if!).

Just read out the tag-name from the document element:

# echoes NewDataSet / string (depending on which XML input)
echo dom_import_simplexml($simplexml)->ownerDocument->documentElement->tagName;

If you have actually an XML document inside another XML document, you can do the following:

// load outer document
$docOuter = new DOMDocument();
$docOuter->loadXML($xmlString);

// load inner document
$doc = new DOMDocument();
$doc->loadXML($docOuter->documentElement->nodeValue);

echo "Root element is named: ", $doc->documentElement->tagName, "\n";

Or if you prefer SimpleXML:

echo "Root element is named: ",
      simplexml_load_string(simplexml_load_string($xmlString))->getName()
;
share|improve this answer
    
As I've asked on another answer, why switch to DOM rather than SimpleXML? –  IMSoP Oct 17 '12 at 17:25
    
Internally SimpleXML and DOM use the same library, so this is not fully a switch. DOM has a more differentiated interface which I normally prefer, the "Simple" in SimpleXML could be read as limited as well. Btw. you can convert vice-versa (as the answer shows), so this is normally no problem. Maybe I was just lazy to search if SimpleXML has something comparable to the documentElement property of DOM. –  hakre Oct 17 '12 at 17:36
    
Yes, I realise it's trivial processing-wise. But as is often the case, the limitation is in your understanding rather than the library: you don't need "documentElement", because that's the element you already have: echo $simplexml->getName() does the same thing in about a 10th of the keystrokes. SimpleXML is actually quite a powerful interface, but its looks are deceptive sometimes. :) –  IMSoP Oct 17 '12 at 17:41
    
Yes that works but you need to have the right element here. If you have a different one (you didn't share any code), it's not that trivial. However in your case, you can just do it like you outlined it. I'm pretty sure you're able to "convert" the DOM code into something equivalent with SimpleXML. –  hakre Oct 17 '12 at 17:47
1  
simplexml_load_string(simplexml_load_string($xmlString))->getName(); its more or less a matter of taste. –  hakre Oct 17 '12 at 17:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.