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When zsh is set as a login shell on Mac OS X, when it is started by iTerm, zsh doesn't consider that it's being run as a login shell, although it's started as ‘-zsh’ (‘-’ is put as the first character of arg[0]) which is supposed to mean that it should start as a login shell.

So, when I set the login shell to bash, bash recognizes this first ‘-’ in $0 and runs as a login shell, but zsh doesn't, although it seems that it should.

Is there a way to either make zsh recognize the ‘-’ in the arg[0], or make iTerm run the shell with a --login command line argument?

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4 Answers

chsh -s /bin/zsh

You'll be prompted for your password, but once you update your settings any new iTerm/Terminal sessions you start on that machine will default to zsh.

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Please, read the question first. The problem is not in setting the default shell, the problem is that zsh isn't detecting that it is started as a login shell. –  ivant Dec 1 '09 at 3:59
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Ah, my apologies. Have you tried using the -i flag to force zsh to start in interactive mode? –  Damien Wilson Dec 1 '09 at 20:00
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His answer does make zsh run as a login shell on Mac OS X in iTerm. It just doesn't go about doing it the way you describe trying to. But it solves the problem that you question (in the title, rather than in the body) presents. The question you end with in the body is a completely different question. If that's your real question (rather than how to make zsh run as login shell) then perhaps you should reword the question in the title. –  iconoclast Feb 10 '11 at 17:45
    
perfect fix, thanks –  chris hough Sep 23 '13 at 6:45
    
You may not have enough rights to execute this command. This is actually not needed as you can configure iTerm to run zsh instead of bash (like Harold suggested). –  Miroslav Nedyalkov Jan 22 at 12:34
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In iTerm preferences Profiles Tab -> General section set Command to: /bin/zsh --login

/bin/zsh --login

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iterm2 doesn't seem to have this option in the General tab. Any idea how to achieve in iterm2 without changing login shell? –  Lloyd Dewolf Apr 14 at 17:08
    
It's general tab on the Profiles Tab. –  Harold Putman Apr 15 at 18:09
    
Aha! That's confusing that there is both a General Tab and a Profiles > General. –  Lloyd Dewolf 3 hours ago
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Have you tried editing the shell entry in account settings.

Go to the Accounts preferences, unlock, and right-click on your user account for the Advanced Settings dialog. Your shell should be /bin/zsh, and you can edit that invocation appropriately (i.e. add the --login argument).

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Unfortunately, that doesn't work: I can set whichever shell I like using chsh (as long as I have this shell listed in /etc/shells), however one cannot add command line arguments to the shell the Advanced preferences dialog (iTerm fails to start the shell up). –  ivant Aug 14 '09 at 9:44
    
Some of the syntax has changed in OS X but the gist is to set your default shell to be /bin/zsh as Brian indicates above –  engineerDave Jun 17 '12 at 20:17
    
I love SO. I've used this answer just now, and only then realised I wrote it nearly 4 years ago! –  Brian Agnew Jun 24 '13 at 10:53
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Use the login utility to create a login shell. Assume that the user you want to log in has the username Alice and that zsh is installed in /opt/local/bin/zsh (e.g., a more recent version installed via MacPorts). In iTerm 2, go to Preferences, Profiles, select the profile that you want to set up, and enter in Command:

login -pfq Alice /opt/local/bin/zsh

See man login for more details on the options.

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