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In one of my projects I need to display new html code inside element everytime the form is submited. So I used Ajax for this, but it doesn't seem to do the job - it only prevents form from submiting, but doesn't display insides of html file (output.html in my case). Can you please help me figure out what i'm doing wrong?

Here's the code of index.html

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="index.css" />
<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.0/jquery.min.js">
</script>
</head>
<body>
<form id="cliform" onsubmit="return false;" action="" method="get">
<div class="cl">>   <input type="text" class="cli" name="cmd" autocomplete='off' value=""     autofocus /></div>
</form>

<script type="text/javascript">
var frm = $('#cliform');
frm.submit(function () {
    $.ajax({
        type: frm.attr('method'),
        url: frm.attr('action'),
        data: frm.serialize(),
        success: function (data) {
            $('#output').load('output.html #content');
        }
    });

    return false;
});
</script>
<div id="output"></div>
</body>
</html>

And here's the output.html

<div id="content">
<h1> Hi </h1>
<p>Hello, World!</p>
</div>
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1  
Well, first things first, the URL. url: frm.attr('action'). Okay, so now let's look at the attribute action. Oh. It's empty. – ahren Oct 7 '12 at 7:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

.load does an ajax request itself, so now you're doing an ajax request in the success handler of another ajax request. The 'outer' request, which is called first, tries to load the url which is in the action attribute of the form, which is empty. So that request probably won't work. If that request fails, the 'inner' request isn't executed at all.

I don't know about the downvote, but that might be because as a webdeveloper, even a beginner, you should be able to identify problems like this by just inspecting the script and network logs that your browser (Chrome of FireFox with FireBug) provides.

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