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I made a query that takes a count of rows in tableA and groups the count by a set_id field into a temporary table c. It then does an UPDATE on tableB by changing the values of its current_count field to the values from table c's count if the count field from table c has the same set_id as the current_count field's set_id value.

UPDATE sets, (
  SELECT
    set_id, 
    COUNT(set_id) AS count
  FROM leads_auto
  GROUP BY set_id
) c 
SET sets.current_count = c.count
WHERE sets.set_id = c.set_id

The shortcoming of this query is that it cannot UPDATE tableB with a current_count value of zero if the no count exists in table c for tableB's set_id.

I tried this

UPDATE sets, (
  SELECT
    set_id,
    COUNT(set_id) AS count
  FROM leads_auto
  GROUP BY set_id
) d
SET sets.current_count = 0 
WHERE sets.set_id != d.set_id

But it does not effect any rows on tableB even though table c returns rows with a set_id in tableB and excludes some set_id's that do exist in tableB.

Anyone know how to accomplish this?

SELECT set_id, COUNT(set_id) AS count FROM leads_auto GROUP BY set_id

Returns

set_id |   count
-------+---------
     1 |       7
     5 |       5
     4 |      16
     7 | 2000000
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The WHERE clause is effectively an INNER JOIN:

WHERE sets.set_id = c.set_id

It returns only rows that exist in both tables. Convert the query to a LEFT JOIN to return NULL values for the right-hand table when no match is found:

UPDATE sets AS s
LEFT JOIN (
  SELECT
   set_id,
   COUNT(set_id) as cnt 
  FROM leads_auto 
  GROUP BY set_id
) d
ON s.set_id = d.set_id
SET s.current_count = COALESCE(d.cnt, 0)
share|improve this answer
    
I get an Error #1064. Good use of coalesce though. – user1464296 Oct 7 '12 at 8:26
    
1064 might mean you can't use count as a column alias? – Andomar Oct 7 '12 at 8:28
    
You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'from sets as s left join ( select set_id , c' at line 1 I used cnt. I always thought UPDATE has to have the form of UPDATE [tablename]? – user1464296 Oct 7 '12 at 8:30
    
Okay so removing the from and the as from as d does the trick. Thanks. – user1464296 Oct 7 '12 at 8:39
    
The as d part should be fine, see also the SQL Fiddle example. – Andomar Oct 7 '12 at 8:53

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