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i have a 'mouse reader' class which can turn rotations into x,y,z. (It's a kind of first person camera) But i don't want the person to look directly at his axis, so i did this:

if (!(Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] > 269) && !(Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] < 91))
{

I couted the checking and it's perfect, it prevents you from going too much up and down, but some times, it goes under 91 and 269, how is this possible?

Thank You

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1  
Why do you write if (!(a > b))? Make it if (a <= b) directly... –  LihO Oct 7 '12 at 8:15
    
You wrote if (!(a > 269) && !(a < 91))... if it's supposed to be a range check, keep it simple: if (a >= 91 && a <= 269) –  LihO Oct 7 '12 at 8:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You've fallen foul of De Morgen's Law

in other words:

!A && !B = !(A || B)

I suspect what you wanted was:

if (!((Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] > 269) || 
      (Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] < 91)))
{

Or even clearer:

if ((Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] <= 269) && 
    (Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] >= 91)))
{
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Note that !(a < b) = (a >= b) –  LihO Oct 7 '12 at 8:39
    
Same problem happens –  Miguel P Oct 7 '12 at 8:41
    
Though it wasn't the solution, this lead me to it. –  Miguel P Oct 7 '12 at 11:03

Ok, just for debugging, Try this inverse logic.

if (  (Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] < 91) &&  (Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1] > 269)  )
{

  //Do nothing here
}
else
{

  //Do stuff here

}
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Range-checking happens quite often so a template will be useful for that:

template< typename _T > bool inrange(_T first, _T last, _T value)
{
    return ((value>=first) && (value<=last));
}

In your case:

if (inrange(91, 269, (Altitude  +  MouseCoordChange[1]))
{
    //is in the range - do something
}
else
{
    //is outside the range - do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, i get an error if i use that function: –  Miguel P Oct 7 '12 at 10:15
    
No wait, my bad, i needed to cast float to the first to values of inrange. –  Miguel P Oct 7 '12 at 10:18
    
@MiguelP: what error do you get? The compiler should infer the type from the parameters, so if it is a type-error, try casting your last parm to int like so: (int)(Altitude + MouseCoordChange[1]) –  slashmais Oct 7 '12 at 10:19
    
Found the solution, though i used your function, thanks! –  Miguel P Oct 7 '12 at 11:03

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