Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to know how to add a time delay inside a Swing app in Java, I used Thread.sleep(time), and also I used SwingWorker but it doesn't work. Here's part of my code:

switch (state) {
    case 'A':
        if (charAux == 'A') {
            state = 'B';                    
            //Here's where I'd like to add a time delay
            jLabel13.setForeground(Color.red);
            break;
        } else {                            
            //Here's where I'd like to add a time delay
            jLabel12.setForeground(Color.red);
            break;
        }
}

I hope you could help me or solve my doubts when I'm using SwingWorker.

share|improve this question
1  
Firstly, don't ever put a delay into the Event Dispatching Thread and always only update the UI from with the EDT. Secondly, I'd take a look at the javax.swing.Timer and examples –  MadProgrammer Oct 7 '12 at 8:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's an example using a javax.swing.Timer

public class TestBlinkingText {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException ex) {
                } catch (InstantiationException ex) {
                } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
                } catch (UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame();
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(new BlinkPane());
                frame.setSize(200, 200);
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }            
        });
    }

    protected static class BlinkPane extends JLabel {

        private JLabel label;
        private boolean state;

        public BlinkPane() {

            label = new JLabel("Look at me!");
            setLayout(new GridBagLayout());

            add(label);

            Timer timer = new Timer(500, new ActionListener() {

                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {                    
                    state = !state;
                    if (state) {
                        label.setForeground(Color.RED);
                    } else {
                        label.setForeground(Color.BLACK);
                    }                    
                    repaint();                    
                }
            });
            timer.setRepeats(true);
            timer.setCoalesce(true);
            timer.setInitialDelay(0);
            timer.start();            
        }        
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'll check it later, I need to sleep n.n thanks everybody –  Juan Reséndiz Oct 7 '12 at 9:32

You'll want to use a Timer if you want to specify a delay for an action.

share|improve this answer
    
a delay for a action, for example 2 seconds –  Juan Reséndiz Oct 7 '12 at 8:53

Good thing you removed the Thread.sleep as that would make your UI unresponsive for those 2 seconds.

What you can do is start a Timer which only runs once:

int delay = 2000;
Timer timer = new Timer( delay, new ActionListener(){
  @Override
  public void actionPerformed( ActionEvent e ){
    jLabel12.setForeground( Color.red );
  }
} );
timer.setRepeats( false );
timer.start();

Note that the Timer is a javax.swing.Timer, which assures that the actionPerformed method of the ActionListener is called on the Event Dispatch Thread, respecting the Swing threading rules.

This is also possible with a SwingWorker, but I would stick to the Timer for this. In case you want to use the SwingWorker, you can simply use Thread.sleep in the doInBackground() method, and update the JLabel in the done() method.

Something along the lines of

class Delay extends SwingWorker<Void, Object> {
 @Override
 public void doInBackground() {
  Thread.sleep( 2000 );
 }

 @Override
 protected void done() {
   jLabel12.setForeground( Color.red );
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 beat me to it –  MadProgrammer Oct 7 '12 at 9:03
    
@MadProgrammer but you provided a SSCCE, while I just provided some snippets (no need to fire up my IDE for that) –  Robin Oct 7 '12 at 9:05
    
I should have a catalog of examples built up by now :P –  MadProgrammer Oct 7 '12 at 9:06
    
It's a good comparison between a Timer & SwingWorker –  MadProgrammer Oct 7 '12 at 9:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.