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I have often been told that I should not use multiple return points, instead I should just use one:

take for example this function;

function data($item){
    switch($item){
        case 'one':
            return 1;
        case 'two':
            return 2;
        case 'three':
            return 3;
        case 'different_type':
            return 'Something Different';
        default:
            return false;
    }
}

Apparently a better way of writing this would be;

function data($item){
    $value = false;
    switch($item){
        case 'one':
            $value = 1;
            break;
        case 'two':
            $value = 2;
            break;
        case 'three':
            $value = 3;
            break;
        case 'different_type':
            $value =  'Something Different';
            break;
        default:
            $value = false;
    }
    return $value;
}

Is there any reason that is not a matter of preference for one over the other?

I imagine that the second one gives some IDE's a better chance at type hinting the return value? but are there performance issues here as well?

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closed as not constructive by Gordon, hakre, Jocelyn, tereško, Mat Oct 7 '12 at 13:43

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
This question has been asked before (unfortunately, on another StackExchange site). You can read the responses here: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/118703/… –  Dai Oct 7 '12 at 11:27
1  
good question but not constructive since opinions will differ. –  Gordon Oct 7 '12 at 11:29
    
Good IDEs have no problem to typehint mutliple return statements. Performance wise there can be a benefit with the so called "early return" or "return early". –  hakre Oct 7 '12 at 11:30
4  
From a theoretical point of view, the multiple return solution has less low level instructions (e.g. no additional variable and assignment). –  Gumbo Oct 7 '12 at 11:33
1  
You'll often hear that when we are talking about optimization, the first question you have to ask isn't "is it faster", but "does it need to be optimized". The better solution is often not the faster. I know the php compiler/vm is not good, but that's not a reason to question the performance issue of declaring a new variable or having multiple returns. If there is a difference, and I wouldn't bet the second solution is faster, it's probably a matter of nanoseconds. You don't want to optimize for such a little performance gain. –  Valentin Perrelle Oct 7 '12 at 11:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is there any reason that is not a matter of preference for one over the other?

Sometimes but that depends on concrete code.

I imagine that the second one gives some IDE's a better chance at type hinting the return value?

No, that is normally not the case.

But are there performance issues here as well?

Early returns can shortcut longer paths in the code so can have a benefit.

A good coding guideline does normally not govern this strictly nowadays, in earlier times with languages not that flexible it might have made sense to keep a strict approach (last line of a function must be the single return command).

Nowadays it is known that it is more important to reduce Cyclomatic Complexity which is often the case with returning early. However, take this with a grain of salt, it's not that if you return early ever, that this is automatically the case.


As you're speaking about code, the first example should be in my eyes:

function data($item) {

    static $map = [
        'one'   => 1,
        'two'   => 2,
        'three' => 3,
        'different_type'
                => 'Something Different',
    ];

    # return @$map[$item] ?: false;
    return isset($map[$item])
        ? $map[$item] 
        : false
        ; 
}

But this would also run counter your example.

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1  
frowns is that a silence operator I see there?!? ::Pulls out scream –  Hailwood Oct 7 '12 at 11:52
    
lol, that is indeed the silence operator, it's used to make development less burdensome. If you like warnings on the normal path, just leave it away. If you think isset is better do the common isset check: isset($map[$item]) ? $map[$item] : false; –  hakre Oct 7 '12 at 11:58
    
@hakre strange .. you are using a silence operator ...... +1 for the explanation anyway –  Baba Oct 7 '12 at 16:38

It's just for readability. The IDE will do fine, and it won't affect performance so much you should worry about it. It's just that code with multiple return points is usually harder to read and debug.

But then again, it's a matter of taste as well, and depends very much on what you're used to.

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Compilers these days are smart enough to compile this kind of code in an efficient way and it might be the case that both of these translate to same set of instruction , personally i think it is easier to understand since the return is at the end of the function.

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PHP is an interpreted language. –  Andy0708 Oct 7 '12 at 11:43
    
agreed , but still it is compiled into bytecode and they do these tricks in that process. Specially in php5 accelerators just cache the bytecode for faster executions. –  Adnan Akbar Oct 7 '12 at 12:24

There should not be a performance issue with the first method, because once your function returns something, rest of the lines in that function are not executed anymore. It should be readability more than anything else.

Edited: In fact, the second iteration should technically use more resource because it has to assign the value to the variable, and then return that variable,but that difference is simply negligible!

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I would prefer the approach with one return point any day. The reason for that is that it is much easier to understand the code. This may seem trivial, but I am sure we have all tried reading someone else's spaghetti code. This makes it easier to understand what is happening throughout the method, especially in more advanced cases where the code paths can be more challenging to understand. Multiple return points is also harder to debug I would say. However, for very simple methods, I think it can be OK to have two return points, but for more complicated scenarios, I would do my best to avoid it.

Regarding performance, I think the difference is minimal in most cases (although it depends how much code has to be executed after what would have been a return point). I think the advantages with better readability would almost always outweigh the performance aspect since there are so many other areas where performance could be enhanced by a much greater margin than little tweaks like these. If, for example, you have database, web service or I/O calls after what could have been a return point, then the performance impact would be greater. In this case, returning "early" would improve performance significantly, but then you could always make sure that these calls are never made in given scenarios, thus avoiding the multiple return points. However, if you really want to optimize low level, then you will end up with more instructions with a single return point. But as I said, there are more important things to optimize I would say.

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