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Suppose I have a recursion with the equation: T(n)= T(n-2) + c .. This means that we are breaking the problem size consequently by a factor of 2 and the order of this algorithm is O(n) which is right! Now, Suppose my equation becomes, T(n)= T(n-2)+cn .. why does the order becomes n2 (to the power of 2) ? I don't want any recursion tree method or any other method to prove it becomes n2 .. Just tell me what does c and cn make the difference here ?

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closed as off topic by Sulthan, Karoly Horvath, nhahtdh, Mat, Mark Oct 7 '12 at 21:29

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You can prove it by expanding the expression to T(0). –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 11:48
    
Thats the first thing i said .. i dont want to prove it.. tell me what difference c and cn make here ? :) –  Chandeep Oct 7 '12 at 11:50
    
programmers.stackexchange.com –  Sulthan Oct 7 '12 at 11:51
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All these boils down to proving or applying theorem. You can't say anything without proving it. –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 11:51
    
@nhahtdh: agree. for this reason I voted to close –  Karoly Horvath Oct 7 '12 at 11:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just tell me what does c and cn make the difference here ?

It means, that the additional work always increases by one c (or two in the case of T(n -2) + cn):

T(n) = T(n-1) + c

If the problem size increases by one, the additional work you need to put in is c, which is constant.

T(n) = T(n-1) + cn

If the problem size increases by one, the additional work you need to put in is one more c than when you last increased the problem size by one.

I.e. suppose you increased the problem size from n to n + 1, which added 10c of additional work. When you now increase the problem size from n + 1 to n + 2, you will need to add an additional 11c of work.

We end up with this series:

d + c + 2c + 3c + 4c + 5c + ...
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can we create an analogy for the work done ? I mean something practical which relates to work done in this case? –  Chandeep Oct 7 '12 at 14:11
    
@user975234 I just used "work" instead of running time because it's shorter ;) Since such exercises are usually about how much time an algorithm takes, I suppose you could say time. –  phant0m Oct 7 '12 at 14:17

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