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I'd like to output a table format text. What I tried to do was echo the elements of an array with '\t' but it was misaligned. my code

for((i=0;i<array_size;i++));
do
   echo stringarray[$i] $'\t' numberarray[$i] $'\t' anotherfieldarray[$i]
done;

My output

a very long string..........     112232432      anotherfield
a smaller string         123124343     anotherfield

Desired output

a very long string..........     112232432      anotherfield
a smaller string                 123124343      anotherfield
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

printf is an amazing little program that many people forget exists. It's rather powerful.

$ for num in 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000; do printf "%10s %s\n" $num "foobar"; done
         1 foobar
        10 foobar
       100 foobar
      1000 foobar
     10000 foobar
    100000 foobar
   1000000 foobar

$ for((i=0;i<array_size;i++));
do
    printf "%10s %10d %10s" stringarray[$i] numberarray[$i] anotherfieldarray[%i]
done

Notice I used %10s for strings. %s is the important part. It tells it to use a string. The 10 in the middle says how many columns it is to be. %d is for numerics (digits).

man 1 printf for more info.

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Use column command:

column -t -s' ' filename
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printf can also be useful. –  Mat Oct 7 '12 at 12:40
1  
Doesn't fits his needs like this. –  sputnick Oct 7 '12 at 15:17
    
@sputnick This exactly fits his needs. The reason he does the \t, which is unnecessary, is to do a tabular column himself which gives a fixed length space between words. All he needs to do is pipe the output to column. –  Blue Moon Oct 7 '12 at 15:21
1  
Depends if or not there are some spaces in the first string... –  sputnick Oct 7 '12 at 15:36
1  
So many useful utilities, yet people don't use them often enough. Thank you. –  Felipe Alvarez Nov 19 at 6:28

To have the exact same output as you need, you need to format the file like that :

a very long string..........\t     112232432\t     anotherfield\n
a smaller string\t      123124343\t     anotherfield\n

And then using :

$ column -t -s $'\t' FILE
a very long string..........  112232432  anotherfield
a smaller string              123124343  anotherfield
share|improve this answer
    
What's the $ in $'\t' doing? –  rjmunro Dec 16 at 13:40
    
It's a tab in the bash syntax, see mywiki.wooledge.org/Quotes –  sputnick Dec 16 at 13:43

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