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I have a coordinate class and a list of coordinates. I have overriden the equals method for the coordinate class but when I use the contains on a list of coordinates I get false for a coordinate which is in the list. Has anyone got an idea where I am going wrong? x and y values are ints.

public boolean equals(Coordinate c){
        return (this.x == c.getxCoordinate() && this.y == c.getyCoordinate());
    }

The list is below:

List safe_locs = new ArrayList<Coordinate>();

The test is below:

System.out.println(c);
System.out.println(safe_locs.contains(c));
System.out.println(safe_locs);

output is:

Coordinate[x: 0, y: 0]
false
[Coordinate[x: 0, y: 0], Coordinate[x: 1, y: 0], Coordinate[x: 0, y: 1], Coordinate[x: 3, y: 0], Coordinate[x: 0, y: 3]]
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1  
can you post the list you have? –  Abubakkar Rangara Oct 7 '12 at 12:45
5  
Of what type are x and y? Are you sure == is the right choice? Furthermore, you did not override the equals method, you just overloaded it... –  home Oct 7 '12 at 12:45
    
Please show the list in which you have stored the coordinated –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Oct 7 '12 at 12:45
    
if either x or y is not of primitive datatype, you need to use equals to compare them. –  a1ex07 Oct 7 '12 at 12:45
1  
If it's not really a List, you'd have problem if you didn't override the hashcode method as well. –  dystroy Oct 7 '12 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your equals() method is overloading equals(Object), while it should override it:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o){
    if(!(o instanceof Coordinate)) {
        return false;
    }
    Coordinate c = (Coordinate)o;
    return (this.x == c.getxCoordinate() && this.y == c.getyCoordinate());
    }

Unfortunately you must use downcasting. Notice the @Override annotation - use it in the future to avoid such problems.

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thats exactly on point. It solved the problem. –  cobie Oct 7 '12 at 12:52

I am aware that many readers will find this equals implementation style unacceptably condensed, but equals is a very standard, all-boilerplate method and, once you implement a couple hundred of them, you tend to appreciate this style more and more:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
   Coordinate that;
   return this == o || o instanceof Coordinate 
     && this.x == (that = (Coordinate)o).getxCoordinate() 
     && this.y == that.getyCoordinate();
}

The point is, whatever implementation style you consistently use, you soon stop looking at the detailed program logic and only notice the salient features: what fields participate and by what means they are compared. As soon as you reach that point, the conciceness of this implementation shines. And if you're suspecting a bug, again—less code, less work to check it.

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I think you have overloaded the equals() method instead of overriding it..

public boolean equals(Object o){

    if(!(o instanceof Coordinate)) {

        return false;
    }
    else{
    Coordinate c = (Coordinate)o;
    return (this.x == c.getxCoordinate() && this.y == c.getyCoordinate());
    }

    }
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