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I have the following recursion:

if(a%2 == 0){
f([a1,a2,...,aN],a,N) = (a1 + aN)/2 + f([a1,a2,...,a(N-1)],a+1,N-1)/2 + 
f([a2,...,aN],a+1,N-1)/2;
}
else{
f([a1,a2,...,aN],a,N) = f([a1,a2,...,a(N-1)],a+1,N-1)/2 + 
f([a2,...,aN],a+1,N-1)/2;
}

Base Case:

f([a1,a2],a,2) = (a1+a2)/2;

Obviously, there'll be a stack overflow if I implement it recursively. How should I make use of Dynamic Programming to obtain optimal solution to this recursion?

[a1,a2,..,aN] respresents an integer array.

The limit for N is 2000 and a1,a2,..,aN <=999.

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3  
why do you think there's going to be a stack overflow? –  Karoly Horvath Oct 7 '12 at 13:43
    
I've tried it, and it keeps giving runtime error...:( –  jigsawmnc Oct 7 '12 at 13:47
    
print N in the body –  Karoly Horvath Oct 7 '12 at 14:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This smells an awful lot like a homework problem. I would suggest that you meet with the lecturer or a TA because this is the sort of thing best learned interactively. If you use this information, make sure to cite it so you don't commit plagiarism.

First, observe that the results are linear in the values [a0, a1, ... aN]. Therefore, you really only need to keep track of their coefficients. For notational purposes, let's write {b1, b2, ..., bN} to represent b1 * a1 + b2 * a2 + ... bN * aN.

Next, work out a few of the recursions by hand:

f([a1, a2], a, 2) = { 1/2, 1/2 } is the base case for N=2.

Let's look at N=3:

f([a1, a2, a3], a, 3) for a even = {1/2, 0, 1/2} + { f([a1, a2], a+1, 2)/2, 0 } + { 0, f([a2, a3], a+1, 2)/2 } = { 1/2, 0, 1/2 } + { 1/4, 1/4, 0 } + { 0, 1/4, 1/4 } = { 3/4, 1/2, 3/4 }.

f([a1, a2, a3], a, 3) for a odd = { f([a1, a2], a+1, 2)/2, 0 } + { 0, f([a2, a3], a+1, 2)/2 } = { 1/2, 0, 1/2 } + { 1/4, 1/4, 0 } + { 0, 1/4, 1/4 } = { 1/4, 1/2, 1/4 }.

Now N=4:

f([a1, a2, a3, a4], a, 4) for a even = { 1/2, 0, 0, 1/2 } + { f[a1, a2, a3], a+1, 3)/2, 0 } + { 0, f([a2, a3, a4], a+1, 3)/2 }. Since a is even, a+1 is odd, so we are in the case F([], even, 3). f([a1, a2, a3, a4], a, 4) for a even = { 1/2, 0, 0, 1/2 } + { 1/8, 1/4, 1/8, 0 } + { 0, 1/8, 1/4, 1/8 } = { 5/8, 3/8, 3/8, 5/8 }.

f([a1, a2, a3, a4], a, 4) for a odd = { f[a1, a2, a3], even, 3)/2, 0 } + { 0, f([a2, a3, a4], even, 3)/2 } = { 3/8, 1/4, 3/8, 0 } + { 0, 3/8, 1/4, 3/8 } = { 3/8, 5/8, 5/8, 3/8 }.

Now you can see that the coefficients depend only on N and whether a even or odd.

This means that your dynamic programming only needs to remember the coefficients for each combination of N and a boolean. Since N is capped at 2000, this means you need only 4000 entries, which shouldn't be too much of a burden. In fact, you could abandon the recursion and simply compute the entire table incrementally like we did above.

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I totally followed the recursion, what i didn't follow was the 'observed' initial array population. I don't see anything in his description about the population of [a1,a2,...] which, granted, is constant anyway, and only adjusting the root index for the next recursion in the odd-a case. Also, given an array A[] of values [1,1], is not the base case then fn() = (1+1)/2 = 1? In your notes you have this as {1/2,1/2} ? Or am i totally reading the notation he (and you) are using incorrectly? Don't kill the inquisition. Been a LONG time since I did recursive coefficients.. thanks. –  WhozCraig Oct 7 '12 at 14:43
    
As described in the second paragraph, the notation {1/2, 1/2} means (1/2)*a1 + (1/2)*a2. –  Raymond Chen Oct 7 '12 at 14:51
    
roger that. I was looking for their sum as defined in his base def. thanks. –  WhozCraig Oct 7 '12 at 14:53
    
@Raymond Chen: Really nice inference. My solution got accepted :) –  jigsawmnc Oct 8 '12 at 13:20
    
@jigsawmnc Did you remember to give credit to the person who designed the solution? (What do you mean by "accepted"? Will the instructor find it suspicious that somebody who originally couldn't do dynamic programming suddenly came up with multiple optimization insights into a recurrence relation?) –  Raymond Chen Oct 8 '12 at 14:29

You need to store answers for all pairs of a,N values

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That is timing out! –  jigsawmnc Oct 7 '12 at 13:46

One can compute the coefficients of each ai in an incremental way. I believe half of the coefficients for a given n need to be computed as the other half would contain repeated elements. So each n will contain n/2 values in the table. This approach will lead to n^2 running time. Dont know this could be improved further.

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@jigsawmnc Is this what the implementation looks like or can it be improved further? –  Jonh Oct 9 '12 at 18:49

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