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I have a function which takes a generic ArrayList<?> as one of the parameters and what I've found is that I get a Java error when I try to use the add method of the ArrayList

no suitable method found for add(MyClass)

What I am trying to accomplish is pass parameters for a Class and an ArrayList and have the function populate the ArrayList with objects of the Class. Though if I could instead create and return the ArrayList from my function, that would be fine too (one less parameter would be nice).

Here is some code to illustrate how I am currently trying to go about this:

public void myFunction(Class clazz, ArrayList<?> myList)
{
  Object myObject=null;
  try{myObject = clazz.newInstance();}catch(Exception e){}      
  myList.add(myObject);
}

... or maybe something like this:

public ArrayList<?> myFunction(Class clazz)
{
  ArrayList<clazz> myList = new ArrayList<clazz>();
  Object myObject=null;
  try{myObject = clazz.newInstance();}catch(Exception e){}      
  myList.add(myObject);
}

If someone could please:

a) show me some code that does this
b) explain how to accomplish my goal using Generics
or c) just let me know where I'm going wrong and provide an alternate way

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your first method can be fixed as:

public <T>
void myFunction(Class<T> clazz, ArrayList<T> myList) {
    T myObject = null;
    try {
        myObject = clazz.newInstance();
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }
    myList.add(myObject);
}

The second one as:

public <T>
ArrayList<T> myFunction(Class<T> clazz) {
    ArrayList<T> myList = new ArrayList<T>();
    T myObject = null;
    try {
        myObject = clazz.newInstance();
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }
    myList.add(myObject);
    return myList;
}

Here T is called a type parameter. You can use any letter or identifier instead of T.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This does exactly what I need. I was able to re-work my code by following the methods you provided. –  Matthew Oct 7 '12 at 14:59

in order to add something to ArrayList, you need to make it's type definition contravariant.

So something like

public <T> void doSomething(...,List<? super T> args,...) 

would work.

share|improve this answer
    
Does T stand for Type in this case? –  Matthew Oct 7 '12 at 14:49
    
T is placeholder for the type, which makes method generic –  jdevelop Oct 7 '12 at 15:04
1  
Thanks, this was along the right path I think. I don't yet have a firm grasp on Generics but I'm getting there. –  Matthew Oct 7 '12 at 15:10
    
With generics you may do lots of fun, just remembering simple rule - covariance allows you to return specific type from method call, and contravariance allows you to pass something specific into method call. –  jdevelop Oct 7 '12 at 17:19

You can use an ArrayList<Object> instead, this will allow you to add objects to your list. As for generics, it's hard to say how you go about using it without seeing the entirety of your code.

public List<?> myFunction(Class clazz) {
    List<Object> l = new ArrayList<Object>();
    Object o = clazz.newInstance();
    l.add(o);
    return l;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I need the ArrayList to stay generic so that I can cast it to the appropriate type when it comes out of the function. –  Matthew Oct 7 '12 at 14:21
    
If it comes to that, I'll definitely post the code. Just trying to keep my post as unspecific as possible but still to the point. –  Matthew Oct 7 '12 at 14:25
    
Further and to clarify: I want to know if it's possible to retain the type of List that is passed in to the function. If I were to use a List<Object> as a container, I would have to later loop through the List<Object> and cast each object to get my List<MyClass>. –  Matthew Oct 7 '12 at 14:34

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