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I need to check the number of different characters in one string whose length can be as long as 20,000 and total test cases of <=10,000. I was doing it by replacing the other characters of the string and then checking its length as the below code shows:

 int no7=myString.replaceAll("[^7]","").length();
 int no0_3=myString.replaceAll("[^0-3]","").length();
 int no5_6=myString.replaceAll("[^56]","").length();

I was wondering how the replaceAll method works and whether it would be faster if I do the counting in one single loop checking each character of the string. Thanks in advance.

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Looping should be faster, but replaceAll solution you have written is a one-liner solution if you are writing code for competitive programming. I would stick with loop for production code, since the intent is clearer that way. –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all you can make the replacement much faster by adding a + after the character class (e.g. [^7]+). That will replace consecutive runs of unwanted characters instead of just a single one at a time. Depending on your input string this may gain you a significant performance boost.

But in your case I wouldn't really replace anything and check the length. What you want is the number of sevens, the number of digits between 0 and 3 and the number of fives and sixes. So just write a single loop that checks those:

int no7 = 0, no0_3 = 0, no5_6 = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < myString.length(); i++) {
  char c = myString.charAt(i);
  if (c == '7') no7++;
  if (c >= '0' && c <= '3') no0_3++;
  if (c == '5' || c == '6') no5_6++;
}

This will be faster because you don't have to construct three individual strings to check their lengths and throw them away again and you also save on the regex construction, parsing and runtime. A simple iteration over every character (which is what the regex must do anyway) therefore cuts down your time to at most a third of the original runtime, if not more.

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for(char c: myString) syntax does not work in java –  Victor Mukherjee Oct 7 '12 at 18:52
    
Sorry; I thought String would implement something like IEnumerable<char>. –  Joey Oct 7 '12 at 18:56

replaceAll internally constructs Pattern and then invokes Matcher methods on supplied string. Compilation of pattern takes some time, so if you're doing that frequently - then using precompiled Pattern in your code as static final field is the best way.

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I was wondering how the replaceAll method works

I think the API documentation already mentions it clearly:

"An invocation of this method of the form str.replaceAll(regex, repl) yields exactly the same result as the expression

Pattern.compile(regex).matcher(str).replaceAll(repl)"

and whether it would be faster if I do the counting in one single loop checking each character of the string

I doubt that, compiled regex is almost always faster than manual character checking. It may be faster if the number of characters is small, but it also depends on how you will build the resulting string (remember that java strings are immutable).

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Uhm, just take a moment and think about what the regex would need to do and consider again how compiling three regexes and then making replacements in a string three times can be any faster than a single loop over the string not replacing anything. –  Joey Oct 7 '12 at 14:35
    
read this? "It may be faster if the number of characters is small, but it also depends on how you will build the resulting string" which is the above case. sorry, I didn't say that I'm taking a more general point of view. –  LeleDumbo Oct 7 '12 at 15:12

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