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Let's say I have a Player class. It has a Move method that takes in a direction parameter, a ChangePosition method that takes in two ints, a Disappear void method, and others.

I want to allow the user (probably using listbox) to be able to add some of those methods to the Player object's behavior. For example, they could choose to have it move right and then move down and then disappear. The methods that they choose would then be added to an event, so that when that event occurs, the methods that they chose would execute.

Has anyone done something like this before? What is the best way to do this? (I'm 13 and I don't know much of design patterns)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, you should put all the game logic into an Engine project, with an Engine class, which is responsible for that alone (handling all the game's logic and communicating with the UI and Framework [and lower layers, if there are any]).

Second, you can have an EngineAction class, which has an enum EngineActionType (Move, ChangePos, Disappear, ...), and other properties. The general idea is this:

Have an enum to hold the types:

public enum EngineActionType
{
    Move,
    ChangePos,
    Disappear,
    ...
}

Create an abstract class to group all the engine action classes logically and add them with the common Type property:

public abstract class EngineAction
{
    public readonly EngineActionType Type;

    protected EngineAction(EngineActionType type)
    {
        this.Type = type;
    }
}

Create a class for each engine action that holds all needed parameters as properties. It should derive from EngineAction and send the appropriate EngineActionType to the base constructor:

public class EngineActionMove : EngineAction
{
    public int XDelta;
    public int YDelta;

    public EngineActionMove() : base(EngineActionType.Move)
    {
    }
}

public class EngineActionChangePos : EngineAction
{
    ...
}

...

After all that, you can put those objects in a list, as the user orders, and the iterate over it, performing them one by one according on their types:

foreach (EngineAction action in actionsToDo)
{
    switch (action.Type)
    {
        case EngineActionType.Move:
            EngineActionMove mvAction = (EngineActionMove)action;

            // Example:
            player.Position = player.Position.Offset(mvAction.XDelta,
                                                     mvAction.YDelta);
            break;
        case EngineActionType.ChangePos:
            EngineActionChangePos cpAction = (EngineActionChangePos)action;

            // Example:
            player.Position = new Point(cpAction.X, cpAction.Y);
            break;
        case EngineActionType.Disappear:
            // Just make the player disappear,
            // because the operation needs no parameters
            player.Disappear();
            break;
        case ...:
        default:
            // maybe throw an error here, to find errors during development
            // it helps you find non-handled action types
    }
}

Further tip: The least logic you have in the UI, the better. Always.

Edit: Great idea by Charleh:

public interface IEngineAction
{
    void Do(Player target);
}

public class EngineActionMove : IEngineAction
{
    public int XDelta;
    public int XDelta;

    public void Do(Player target)
    {
        // Example
        target.Position = ...
    }
}

public class EngineActionDisappear : IEngineAction
{
    public void Do(Player target)
    {
        // Example
        target.Visible = false;
    }
}

...

Adding to list example:

var actionsToDo = new List<IEngineAction>();

actionsToDo.Add(new EngineActionDisappear());
actionsToDo.Add(new EngineActionMove { XDelta = 10, YDelta = 20 });

And iteration:

foreach (IEngineAction action in actionsToDo)
{
    action.Do(player);
}
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1  
Good info, though I probably would create each action as a separate class which knew how to act upon it's target object which all implemented an interface. This way you could queue actions in a list and not need to write a case statement in the main players 'actions' body. It also means instead of inheritance from a common base object you could use composition and avoid the need to have a super class –  Charleh Oct 7 '12 at 15:08
    
@Charleh Very nice suggestion. It is better to have them implement an IEngineAction interface, indeed. Great idea! I'll add that to the answer! –  Yorye Nathan Oct 7 '12 at 15:16
    
Thanks! I thought I was going to have to use delegates or anonymous methods and stuff I don't really know, but your answer helped me realize the power of interfaces. –  Jutanium Oct 7 '12 at 15:39
    
Glad you like the idea, been using Caliburn.Micro a lot lately and starting to realise how powerful simple interfaces are for composition - just makes a lot more sense to implement an interface instead of getting this huge complex inheritance chain in which small changes at the bottom of the chain can mean everything breaks - and adding a little bit of functionality is a meticulous and detail heavy thing...! I've done a few game engines and I found the composition was the easier way to keep things functional yet simple –  Charleh Oct 7 '12 at 19:20

Another option is to use an Action generic and just add the methods you want and you can then invoke those actions on any particular player object.

This is just an alternative to the inteface design idea proposed by others, but your style may prefer this method.

Action<Player> playerActions = p => {}; //Do Nothing
playerActions += p => { p.Move(3); }; //Move
playerActions += p => { p.ChangePosition(1, 1); }; //Change position
playerActions += p => { p.Disappear(); }; //Disappear

//Invoke Actions
Player player = new Player();
playerActions(player);

//Invoke on another object as well
Player player2 = new Player();
playerActions(player2);
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Simpler... I like this idea as well. –  Jutanium Oct 10 '12 at 0:03
    
Could you tell me how to add a list of Actions to an event? –  Jutanium Oct 10 '12 at 0:04

There's many ways to do it. One way is to use a factory pattern and a strategy pattern.

public static class PlayerBuilder
{
    public static Player BuildPlayer(BuildDefinition definition)
    {
        //logic in here to build a player -- pseudo-return value below as an example
        var strategy = new PlayerMovementStrategy();
        return new Player(strategy);
    }
}

Your BuildDefinition class could be built off of your user selections. It sounds like they can't just add anything, but rather choose from a list of predefined options. Create the appropriate strategies based on your UI selections.

abstract class MovementStrategy
{
    public abstract void Move();
    public abstract void ChangePosition(Direction d);    
}
class PlayerMovementStrategy
{
    public override void Move()
    {
        //move
    }
    public override void ChangePosition(Direction d)
    {
        //change position
    }
}
abstract class VisibilityStrategy
{
    public abstract void Disappear();
}
class PlayerVisibilityStrategy
{
    public void Disappear()
    {
        //poof 
    }
}

class Player
{
     private readonly PlayerMovementStrategy movement;
     private readonly PlayerVisibilityStrategy visibility;

     public Player(PlayerMovementStrategy movement, PlayerVisibilityStrategy visibility)
     {
         this.movement = movement;
         this.visibility = visibility;
     }

     public void Disappear()
     {
         visibility.Disappear();
     }         
     public void Move(Direction d)
     {
         movement.Move(d);
     }
}
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