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How to check if one file is the same (has the same content) as the other file using Unix C? I mean, when I cant use fopen, fread, fclose but just open, read, close? I'm interested in answers which shows how to do this ONLY in Unix C. Thanks.

I wrote a program that copies one file to another but have no idea how to check if they're the same :/ :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    const char *in_filename = "in.txt", *out_filename = "out.txt";
    int in_fd, out_fd, bytes_read, bytes_written;
    int buffsize = 512;
    char buffer[512];
    int success = 0;

    in_fd = open(in_filename, O_RDONLY);
    if (in_fd == -1)
        return -1;
    out_fd = open(out_filename, O_WRONLY | O_APPEND, S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR);
    if (out_fd == -1)
        return -1;

    for(;;)
    {
        bytes_read = read(in_fd, buffer, buffsize);
        if (bytes_read > 0)
        {
            bytes_written = write(out_fd, buffer, bytes_read);
            if(bytes_written < 0)
                return -1;
        }
        else
        {
            if (bytes_read == 0)
            {
                if (close(in_fd) < 0)
                    return -1;
                if (close(out_fd) < 0)
                    return -1;
                success = 1;
                break;
            }
            else if (bytes_read == -1)
            {
                break;
                return -1;
            }
        }
    }

    if(success)
        fprintf(stdout, "%s", "Success!\n");

    return 0;
}

Heres what I tried:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    const char *in_filename = "in.txt", *out_filename = "out.txt";
    int in_fd, out_fd, bytes_read_in, bytes_read_out;
    int buffsize = 512;
    char in_buffer[512], out_buffer[512];
    int the_same = 0;

    in_fd = open(in_filename, O_RDONLY);
    if (in_fd == -1)
        return -1;
    out_fd = open(out_filename, O_RDONLY);
    if (out_fd == -1)
        return -1;

    for(;;)
    {
        bytes_read_in = read(in_fd, in_buffer, buffsize);
        if (bytes_read_in > 0)
        {
            bytes_read_out = read(out_fd, out_buffer, buffsize);
            if(bytes_read_out > 0)
            {
                int i = 0;
                for(i=0; i<buffsize; i++)
                {
                    if(in_buffer[i] != out_buffer[i])
                        the_same = 0;
                }
                the_same = 1;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (bytes_read_in == 0)
            {
                if (close(in_fd) < 0)
                    return -1;
                if (close(out_fd) < 0)
                    return -1;
                break;
            }
            else if (bytes_read_in == -1)
            {
                break;
                return -1;
            }
        }
    }

    if(the_same)
        fprintf(stdout, "%s", "Files are the same!\n");

    return 0;
}

but it shows that files are the same, while theyre not :(

share|improve this question
2  
Have you tried something and stuck somewhere? –  Rohan Oct 7 '12 at 14:44
    
@Rohan: yup I wrote a program that copies one file to another but have no idea how to check if they're the same :/ –  Katie Oct 7 '12 at 14:45
    
Check files both have the same size, then open both files and compare them byte by byte. –  Paul R Oct 7 '12 at 14:46
    
The question is in context of what you are trying to achieve! –  Rohan Oct 7 '12 at 14:47
    
If you can only use open, write and close, just open both files and write '\0' into both. Now they're the same! –  Kerrek SB Oct 7 '12 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You just have to read two buffers in the same time. For instance (also, think to handle errors), without using C standard library at all:

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define BUFFER_SIZE 1024

static int 
bufcmp(const void *p, const void *q, size_t n)
{
    const char *p1 = p;
    const char *p2 = q;

    while (n-- > 0) {
        if (*p1++ != *p2++)
            return 0;
    }

    return 1;
}

int
main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{
    int fd1 = open(argv[1], O_RDONLY);
    int fd2 = open(argv[2], O_RDONLY);
    int same = 1;

    for (;;) {
        char buf1[BUFFER_SIZE], buf2[BUFFER_SIZE];
        ssize_t n1 = read(fd1, buf1, BUFFER_SIZE);
        ssize_t n2 = read(fd2, buf2, BUFFER_SIZE);

        if (n1 < n2) {
            same = 0;
            break;
        } else if (n1 == 0) {
            break;
        } else if (bufcmp(buf1, buf2, n1) == 0) {
            same = 0;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (same)
        write(STDOUT_FILENO, "Same content.\n", 14);

    close(fd1);
    close(fd2);    

    return 0;
}

NB (Thanks to user4815162342): This code is not wholly right. Indeed, it is not an error if the number of bytes read returned by read is smaller than the number of bytes requested. However, to shorten this code, I didn't include this management.

share|improve this answer
    
geez, your edit is exactly what I need! Thanks:) –  Katie Oct 7 '12 at 15:18
1  
This code is buggy: there is no guarantee that both calls to read will return all requested data at once. read can return less data than requested. –  user4815162342 Oct 7 '12 at 19:17
    
Please consider fixing the posted code in the case when two calls to read return different sizes for the same file, or at least mentioning the problem. Your answer is accepted, so future users will find it and refer to the code it contains. –  user4815162342 Oct 8 '12 at 8:16
    
That's right (but please be patient; I was working). –  md5 Oct 8 '12 at 16:57

What's the problem with using two buffers, one for each file, reading the same number of bytes into each and then comparing the buffer contents with memcmp?

share|improve this answer
    
is memcmp defined in unix kernel? If no, I cant use it :( –  Katie Oct 7 '12 at 15:01
    
Anyway, you can write your own... –  md5 Oct 7 '12 at 15:04
    
There is'nt a problem to use memcmp, it's C standard, but you can have a problem with big files to allocate enough memory. –  user411313 Oct 7 '12 at 16:31
    
The buffer can be as small as one byte. You just iterate reading a buffer full, compare, if equal read the next buffer full. Repeat until difference found or EOF. –  Jens Oct 7 '12 at 17:02
    
@Katie You can write a memcmp in basically one line of C if you are not allowed to use the Standard C version. Any kernel is likely to have an equivalent function anyway. –  Jens Oct 7 '12 at 17:04

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