Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a piece of code and I could not figure out why it is giving me Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError.

This is the question:

Given a positive integer n, prints out the sum of the lengths of the Syracuse 
sequence starting in the range of 1 to n inclusive. So, for example, the call:
lengths(3)
will return the the combined length of the sequences:
1
2 1
3 10 5 16 8 4 2 1 
which is the value: 11. lengths must throw an IllegalArgumentException if 
its input value is less than one.

My Code:

import java.util.HashMap;

public class Test {

HashMap<Integer,Integer> syraSumHashTable = new HashMap<Integer,Integer>();

public Test(){

}

public int lengths(int n)throws IllegalArgumentException{

    int sum =0;

    if(n < 1){
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Error!! Invalid Input!");
    }   

    else{


        for(int i =1; i<=n;i++){

            if(syraSumHashTable.get(i)==null)
            {
                syraSumHashTable.put(i, printSyra(i,1));
                sum += (Integer)syraSumHashTable.get(i);

            }

            else{

                sum += (Integer)syraSumHashTable.get(i);
            }



        }

        return sum;

    }



}

private int printSyra(int num, int count){

    int n = num;

    if(n == 1){

        return count;
    }

    else{   
            if(n%2==0){

                return printSyra(n/2, ++count);
            }

            else{

                return printSyra((n*3)+1, ++count) ;

            }

    }


}
}

Driver code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    Test s1 = new Test();
    System.out.println(s1.lengths(90090249));
    //System.out.println(s1.lengths(5));
}

. I know the problem lies with the recursion. The error does not occur if the input is a small value, example: 5. But when the number is huge, like 90090249, I got the Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError. Thanks all for your help. :)

I almost forgot the error msg:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:60)
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:65)
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:60)
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:65)
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:60)
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:60)
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:60)
at Test.printSyra(Test.java:60)
share|improve this question
    
Most likely integer overflow. Use long instead. (And there is no need to use recursion here, although if implement correctly, there should be no StackOverflow error for certain range of number). –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 15:24
    
I don't actually see a recursion here?? Are you hiding something?? where is your printSyra(i,1) method? –  Rohit Jain Oct 7 '12 at 15:25
    
@RohitJain printSyra invokes printSyra –  Pshemo Oct 7 '12 at 15:26
    
@Pshemo.. How can you assume that?? Its not there.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 7 '12 at 15:27
    
@RohitJain check returns of printSyra method. –  Pshemo Oct 7 '12 at 15:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your algorithm is fine. However int is too small for your computations, it fails for this input:

printSyra(113383, 1);

At some point integer overflows to negative value and your implementation goes crazy, recursing infinitely. Change int num to long num and you'll be fine - for some time. Later you'll need BigInteger.

Note that according to Wikipedia on Collatz conjecture (bold mine):

The longest progression for any initial starting number less than 100 million is 63,728,127, which has 949 steps. For starting numbers less than 1 billion it is 670,617,279, with 986 steps, and for numbers less than 10 billion it is 9,780,657,630, with 1132 steps.

The total number of steps is equivalent to maximum nesting level (stack depth) you can expect. So even for relatively big numbers StackOverflowError should not occur. Have a look at this implementation using BigInteger:

private static int printSyra(BigInteger num, int count) {
    if (num.equals(BigInteger.ONE)) {
        return count;
    }
    if (num.mod(BigInteger.valueOf(2)).equals(BigInteger.ZERO)) {
        return printSyra(num.divide(BigInteger.valueOf(2)), count + 1);
    } else {
        return printSyra(num.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(3)).add(BigInteger.ONE), count + 1);
    }
}

It works even for very big values:

printSyra(new BigInteger("9780657630"), 0)  //1132
printSyra(new BigInteger("104899295810901231"), 0)  //2254
share|improve this answer
    
@Kiyura: see my update on stack depth. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 7 '12 at 15:34
    
I guess I'm confused myself, here - I thought that stack overflows generally occur when the relatively small stack (where function state is stored) runs out of memory after too many recursive calls, not because of some integer being too large. Unless I'm misunderstanding your answer? I do agree that using int instead of long is probably the real cause of OP's problem, but it's still possible to recurse deeply enough to cause a stack overflow regardless of how large you can make the input number. –  jrajav Oct 7 '12 at 15:38
    
@Tomasz: Thanks. I have changed int num to long num and now I faces another error: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space at java.util.HashMap.resize(HashMap.java:462) at java.util.HashMap.addEntry(HashMap.java:755) at java.util.HashMap.put(HashMap.java:385) at Test.lengths(Test.java:26) at TestApp.main(TestApp.java:10) –  Ray.R.Chua Oct 7 '12 at 15:43
1  
@Kiyura: I wrote: "[...]integer overflows [...] and your implementation goes crazy, recursing infinitely" - the reason this implementation fails is not because of too deep recursion (it's never that deep, as Wikipedia says), but because of integer overflow - that causes abnormally deep recursion. When implementation is correct, StackOverflowError is not a problem. But you are right, without tail recursion optimization this implementation is still a bit inefficient - but very clear from readability perspective. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 7 '12 at 16:02
1  
@Ray.R.Chua: Near the end, your HashMap will store around 100 million elements. Do you even need it? As for speeding up, you can return value early in printSyra if you have encountered an element that you have calculated before using the HashMap. –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 16:13

One solution is to allow the JVM to take more space for stack recursion, using the java -Xss parameter. Its default is less than a megabyte, IIRC, which could limit to a couple of hundred recursions max.

A better solution is to rewrite the exercise without recursion:

private int printSyra(int num){
    int count = 1;    
    int n = num;    
    while(n != 1){

            if(n%2==0){    
                n = n/2;
                ++count;
            }    
            else{    
                n=(n*3)+1;
                ++count;    
            }    
    }
    return count;
}
share|improve this answer
    
My implementation with recursion can run with N = 104899295810901231 which has length of 2254 (ericr.nl/wondrous/delrecs.html). While I agree that recursion may be a problem, the intermediate numbers can overflow the range of integer way before the recursion problem kicks in. –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 16:05
1  
Your version still fails to compute for numbers as small as 113383 - but instead of throwing StackOverflowException, goes into an infinite loop. Moreover increasing the stack size won't help for broken algorithm (wrong variable type). –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 7 '12 at 16:27

This is an inherent problem with recursive algorithms. Make the number of recursions large enough and you can't really avoid a stack overflow, unless the language can guarantee tail-call optimization (Java and most C-like languages don't). The only way to truly fix it is to "unroll" the recursion, rewriting the algorithm iteratively or with a helper function to simulate the state-passing of the recursive call without actually nesting calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure why downvote.. am I missing something? Please comment if you downvote. –  jrajav Oct 7 '12 at 15:27
    
Recursion is fine here. Real problem is with integer overflow. –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 15:28
1  
Hmm, are you sure? Documentation for java.lang.StackOverflowError: Thrown when a stack overflow occurs because an application recurses too deeply. –  jrajav Oct 7 '12 at 15:30
    
I'm sure, because I know what the OP is doing in printSyra. There should be enough stack for a few hundred levels. –  nhahtdh Oct 7 '12 at 15:31
1  
@Ray.R.Chua Best solution would be implementing it without recursion (this way you get rid of StackOverflow error). Also since you cant know Maximum number that will be generated while counting 3x+1 avoid integer and use something bigger long or maybe BigInteger. –  Pshemo Oct 7 '12 at 15:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.