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I want to write a function that takes an array of letters as an argument and a number of those letters to select.

Say you provide an array of 8 letters and want to select 3 letters from that. Then you should get:

8! / ((8 - 3)! * 3!) = 56

Arrays (or words) in return consisting of 3 letters each.

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45 Answers

In Python, taking advantage of recursion and the fact that everything is done by reference. This will take a lot of memory for very large sets, but has the advantage that the initial set can be a complex object. It will find only unique combinations.

import copy

def find_combinations( length, set, combinations = None, candidate = None ):
    # recursive function to calculate all unique combinations of unique values
    # from [set], given combinations of [length].  The result is populated
    # into the 'combinations' list.
    #
    if combinations == None:
        combinations = []
    if candidate == None:
        candidate = []

    for item in set:
        if item in candidate:
            # this item already appears in the current combination somewhere.
            # skip it
            continue

        attempt = copy.deepcopy(candidate)
        attempt.append(item)
        # sorting the subset is what gives us completely unique combinations,
        # so that [1, 2, 3] and [1, 3, 2] will be treated as equals
        attempt.sort()

        if len(attempt) < length:
            # the current attempt at finding a new combination is still too
            # short, so add another item to the end of the set
            # yay recursion!
            find_combinations( length, set, combinations, attempt )
        else:
            # the current combination attempt is the right length.  If it
            # already appears in the list of found combinations then we'll
            # skip it.
            if attempt in combinations:
                continue
            else:
                # otherwise, we append it to the list of found combinations
                # and move on.
                combinations.append(attempt)
                continue
    return len(combinations)

You use it this way. Passing 'result' is optional, so you could just use it to get the number of possible combinations... although that would be really inefficient (it's better done by calculation).

size = 3
set = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
result = []

num = find_combinations( size, set, result ) 
print "size %d results in %d sets" % (size, num)
print "result: %s" % (result,)

You should get the following output from that test data:

size 3 results in 10 sets
result: [[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 4], [1, 2, 5], [1, 3, 4], [1, 3, 5], [1, 4, 5], [2, 3, 4], [2, 3, 5], [2, 4, 5], [3, 4, 5]]

And it will work just as well if your set looks like this:

set = [
    [ 'vanilla', 'cupcake' ],
    [ 'chocolate', 'pudding' ],
    [ 'vanilla', 'pudding' ],
    [ 'chocolate', 'cookie' ],
    [ 'mint', 'cookie' ]
]
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In VB.Net, this algorithm collects all combinations of n numbers from a set of numbers (PoolArray). e.g. all combinations of 5 picks from "8,10,20,33,41,44,47".

Sub CreateAllCombinationsOfPicksFromPool(ByVal PicksArray() As UInteger, ByVal PicksIndex As UInteger, ByVal PoolArray() As UInteger, ByVal PoolIndex As UInteger)
    If PicksIndex < PicksArray.Length Then
        For i As Integer = PoolIndex To PoolArray.Length - PicksArray.Length + PicksIndex
            PicksArray(PicksIndex) = PoolArray(i)
            CreateAllCombinationsOfPicksFromPool(PicksArray, PicksIndex + 1, PoolArray, i + 1)
        Next
    Else
        ' completed combination. build your collections using PicksArray.
    End If
End Sub

        Dim PoolArray() As UInteger = Array.ConvertAll("8,10,20,33,41,44,47".Split(","), Function(u) UInteger.Parse(u))
        Dim nPicks as UInteger = 5
        Dim Picks(nPicks - 1) As UInteger
        CreateAllCombinationsOfPicksFromPool(Picks, 0, PoolArray, 0)
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My implementation in c/c++

here my implementation in c++, it write all combinations to specified files, but behaviour can be changed, i made in to generate various dictionaries, it accept min and max length and character range, currently only ansi supported, it enough for my needs

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I have written a class to handle common functions for working with the binomial coefficient, which is the type of problem that your problem falls under. It performs the following tasks:

  1. Outputs all the K-indexes in a nice format for any N choose K to a file. The K-indexes can be substituted with more descriptive strings or letters. This method makes solving this type of problem quite trivial.

  2. Converts the K-indexes to the proper index of an entry in the sorted binomial coefficient table. This technique is much faster than older published techniques that rely on iteration. It does this by using a mathematical property inherent in Pascal's Triangle. My paper talks about this. I believe I am the first to discover and publish this technique, but I could be wrong.

  3. Converts the index in a sorted binomial coefficient table to the corresponding K-indexes.

  4. Uses Mark Dominus method to calculate the binomial coefficient, which is much less likely to overflow and works with larger numbers.

  5. The class is written in .NET C# and provides a way to manage the objects related to the problem (if any) by using a generic list. The constructor of this class takes a bool value called InitTable that when true will create a generic list to hold the objects to be managed. If this value is false, then it will not create the table. The table does not need to be created in order to perform the 4 above methods. Accessor methods are provided to access the table.

  6. There is an associated test class which shows how to use the class and its methods. It has been extensively tested with 2 cases and there are no known bugs.

To read about this class and download the code, see Tablizing The Binomial Coeffieicent.

It should not be hard to convert this class to C++.

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How about this answer ...this prints all combinations of length 3 ...and it can generalised for any length ... Working code ...

#include<iostream>
#include<string>
using namespace std;

void combination(string a,string dest){
int l = dest.length();
if(a.empty() && l  == 3 ){
 cout<<dest<<endl;}
else{
  if(!a.empty() && dest.length() < 3 ){
     combination(a.substr(1,a.length()),dest+a[0]);}
  if(!a.empty() && dest.length() <= 3 ){
      combination(a.substr(1,a.length()),dest);}
 }

 }

 int main(){
 string demo("abcd");
 combination(demo,"");
 return 0;
 }
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And here's a Clojure version that uses the same algorithm I describe in my OCaml implementation answer:

(defn select
  ([items]
     (select items 0 (inc (count items))))
  ([items n1 n2]
     (reduce concat
             (map #(select % items)
                  (range n1 (inc n2)))))
  ([n items]
     (let [
           lmul (fn [a list-of-lists-of-bs]
                     (map #(cons a %) list-of-lists-of-bs))
           ]
       (if (= n (count items))
         (list items)
         (if (empty? items)
           items
           (concat
            (select n (rest items))
            (lmul (first items) (select (dec n) (rest items))))))))) 

It provides three ways to call it:

(a) for exactly n selected items as the question demands:

  user=> (count (select 3 "abcdefgh"))
  56

(b) for between n1 and n2 selected items:

user=> (select '(1 2 3 4) 2 3)
((3 4) (2 4) (2 3) (1 4) (1 3) (1 2) (2 3 4) (1 3 4) (1 2 4) (1 2 3))

(c) for between 0 and the size of the collection selected items:

user=> (select '(1 2 3))
(() (3) (2) (1) (2 3) (1 3) (1 2) (1 2 3))
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yet another recursive solution (you should be able to port this to use letters instead of numbers) using a stack, a bit shorter than most though:

stack = [] 
def choose(n,x):
   r(0,0,n+1,x)

def r(p, c, n,x):
   if x-c == 0:
      print stack
      return

   for i in range(p, n-(x-1)+c):
      stack.append(i)
      r(i+1,c+1,n,x)
      stack.pop()


#4 choose 3 or I want all 3 combinations of numbers starting with 0 to 4
choose(4,3) 

[0, 1, 2]
[0, 1, 3]
[0, 1, 4]
[0, 2, 3]
[0, 2, 4]
[0, 3, 4]
[1, 2, 3]
[1, 2, 4]
[1, 3, 4]
[2, 3, 4]
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Here's a coffeescript implementation

combinations: (list, n) ->
        permuations = Math.pow(2, list.length) - 1
        out = []
        combinations = []

        while permuations
            out = []

            for i in [0..list.length]
                y = ( 1 << i )
                if( y & permuations and (y isnt permuations))
                    out.push(list[i])

            if out.length <= n and out.length > 0
                combinations.push(out)

            permuations--

        return combinations 
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Here is my Scala solution:

def combinations[A](s: List[A], k: Int): List[List[A]] = 
  if (k > s.length) Nil
  else if (k == 1) s.map(List(_))
  else combinations(s.tail, k - 1).map(s.head :: _) ::: combinations(s.tail, k)
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Clojure version:


(defn comb [k l]
  (if (= 1 k) (map vector l)
      (apply concat
             (map-indexed
              #(map (fn [x] (conj x %2))
                    (comb (dec k) (drop (inc %1) l)))
              l))))
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this is my contribution in javascript (no recursion)

set = ["q0", "q1", "q2", "q3"]
collector = []


function comb(num) {
  results = []
  one_comb = []
  for (i = set.length - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
    tmp = Math.pow(2, i)
    quotient = parseInt(num / tmp)
    results.push(quotient)
    num = num % tmp
  }
  k = 0
  for (i = 0; i < results.length; ++i)
    if (results[i]) {
      ++k
      one_comb.push(set[i])
    }
  if (collector[k] == undefined)
    collector[k] = []
  collector[k].push(one_comb)
}


sum = 0
for (i = 0; i < set.length; ++i)
  sum += Math.pow(2, i)
 for (ii = sum; ii > 0; --ii)
  comb(ii)
 cnt = 0
for (i = 1; i < collector.length; ++i) {
  n = 0
  for (j = 0; j < collector[i].length; ++j)
    document.write(++cnt, " - " + (++n) + " - ", collector[i][j], "<br>")
  document.write("<hr>")
}   
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All said and and done here comes the O'caml code for that. Algorithm is evident from the code..

let combi n lst =
    let rec comb l c =
        if( List.length c = n) then [c] else
        match l with
        [] -> []
        | (h::t) -> (combi t (h::c))@(combi t c)
    in
        combi lst []
;;
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Perhaps I've missed the point (that you need the algorithm and not the ready made solution), but it seems that scala does it out of the box (now):

def combis(str:String, k:Int):Array[String] = {
  str.combinations(k).toArray 
}

Using the method like this: println(combis("abcd",2).toList) Will produce: List(ab, ac, ad, bc, bd, cd)

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Short fast C# implementation

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Combinations<T>(IEnumerable<T> elements, int k)
{
    return Combinations(elements.Count(), k).Select(p => p.Select(q => elements.ElementAt(q)));                
}      

public static List<int[]> Combinations(int setLenght, int subSetLenght) //5, 3
{
    var result = new List<int[]>();

    var lastIndex = subSetLenght - 1;
    var dif = setLenght - subSetLenght;
    var prevSubSet = new int[subSetLenght];
    var lastSubSet = new int[subSetLenght];
    for (int i = 0; i < subSetLenght; i++)
    {
        prevSubSet[i] = i;
        lastSubSet[i] = i + dif;
    }

    while(true)
    {
        //add subSet ad result set
        var n = new int[subSetLenght];
        for (int i = 0; i < subSetLenght; i++)
            n[i] = prevSubSet[i];

        result.Add(n);

        if (prevSubSet[0] >= lastSubSet[0])
            break;

        //start at index 1 because index 0 is checked and breaking in the current loop
        int j = 1;
        for (; j < subSetLenght; j++)
        {
            if (prevSubSet[j] >= lastSubSet[j])
            {
                prevSubSet[j - 1]++;

                for (int p = j; p < subSetLenght; p++)
                    prevSubSet[p] = prevSubSet[p - 1] + 1;

                break;
            }
        }

        if (j > lastIndex)
            prevSubSet[lastIndex]++;
    }

    return result;
}
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Short fast C implementation

#include <stdio.h>

void main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  const int n = 6; /* The size of the set; for {1, 2, 3, 4} it's 4 */
  const int p = 4; /* The size of the subsets; for {1, 2}, {1, 3}, ... it's 2 */
  int comb[40] = {0}; /* comb[i] is the index of the i-th element in the combination */

  int i = 0;
  for (int j = 0; j <= n; j++) comb[j] = 0;
  while (i >= 0) {
    if (comb[i] < n + i - p + 1) {
       comb[i]++;
       if (i == p - 1) { for (int j = 0; j < p; j++) printf("%d ", comb[j]); printf("\n"); }
       else            { comb[++i] = comb[i - 1]; }
    } else i--; }
}

To see how fast it is, use this code and test it

#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  const int n = 32; /* The size of the set; for {1, 2, 3, 4} it's 4 */
  const int p = 16; /* The size of the subsets; for {1, 2}, {1, 3}, ... it's 2 */
  int comb[40] = {0}; /* comb[i] is the index of the i-th element in the combination */

  int c = 0; int i = 0;
  for (int j = 0; j <= n; j++) comb[j] = 0;
  while (i >= 0) {
    if (comb[i] < n + i - p + 1) {
       comb[i]++;
       /* if (i == p - 1) { for (int j = 0; j < p; j++) printf("%d ", comb[j]); printf("\n"); } */
       if (i == p - 1) c++;
       else            { comb[++i] = comb[i - 1]; }
    } else i--; }
  printf("%d!%d == %d combination(s) in %15.3f second(s)\n ", p, n, c, clock()/1000.0);
}

test with cmd.exe (windows):

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

c:\Program Files\lcc\projects>combination
16!32 == 601080390 combination(s) in          5.781 second(s)

c:\Program Files\lcc\projects>

Have a nice day.

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