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I have a table which looks somewhat like this :-

A      B        C         D 
1      2        0         2012-10-05 18:37:00
1      3        0         2012-10-05 20:37:00
1      4        1         2012-04-07 18:37:00
2      1        1         2012-10-05 18:12:40
2      2        0         2012-10-04 18:37:00
2      3        0         2011-10-05 12:37:00

ColA and ColB uniquely identify a row. However, its not a primary key. ColC can be either 0 or 1. ColD is a datetime field. I need to retain only 10 rows(or less) from this table having colC as 0 and 10 rows(or less) having colC as 1, for a maximum total no. of rows as 20. These 10 rows(each) are the most recent rows, ie the 10 most recent rows(based on colD values) having 0 as their colC values. Similarly, the (upto) 10 rows retained having ColC values as 1, should be the first 10 rows having 1 as ColC values.

Currently, I am firing 4 queries in order to achieve this. I fire one query each for colC value as 0 and 1 to get the timestamp of the 11th row(or less). Then for each value obtained i fire another query to delete all the "older" rows.

Can I fire one single query to achieve this? If not, what is the most optimal solution to this?

PS:- I am using active record in my application and will have to modify the query accordingly.

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what have you done on it? do you have a non-working query? –  Darshan Thanki Oct 7 '12 at 16:21
    
I was trying to use the groupby command to somehow get both the values for the timestamp in one query and then delete the rows in another query. –  Gyanendra Singh Oct 7 '12 at 16:37
    
Please show that code so we can help out more on it. –  Darshan Thanki Oct 7 '12 at 16:41
    
@DarshanThanki The code doesn't exist yet, that's the question. –  jTC Oct 7 '12 at 16:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This will work (see http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/161af/1):

delete from t
where not exists (select 1
                  from ((select A, B
                         from t
                         where C = 0
                         order by D desc
                         limit 10
                        ) union all
                        (select A, B
                         from t
                         where C = 1
                         order by D desc
                         limit 10
                        )
                       ) a
                  where a.A = t.A and a.B = t.B
                 )

This creates the list of the 20 values you want to keep, and removes the rest.

If performance is a concern, I might suggest you put the 20 rows in a separate table, truncate the original table, and then insert them in.

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Good try, but it didn't work for me locally. It didn't limit each group to only 10 records. –  Ross Smith II Oct 7 '12 at 18:43
    
@RossSmithII . . . This is strange. The query is not doing anything complicated. It just chooses the 20 records to keep and deletes the rest. What happens? Are you sure A and B uniquely identify each row? –  Gordon Linoff Oct 7 '12 at 18:49
    
I'm not sure where the glitch is, but look at sqlfiddle.com/#!2/51670/1 and see it in action. Please note that my first answer was completely wrong, but seeing your answer steered me in the right direction, so you should get credit for my answer! –  Ross Smith II Oct 7 '12 at 19:04
    
@RossSmithII . . . As I suspected, your data directly contradicts the statement in your question that "ColA and ColB uniquely identify a row." If this is not true, then the above query will not work. However, it should answer your original question. –  Gordon Linoff Oct 7 '12 at 19:19
    
You're right! Your query does work: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/161af/1 My sincere apologies! –  Ross Smith II Oct 7 '12 at 19:31

This should work for you:

DELETE
  ex
FROM
  ex
INNER JOIN
(
  SELECT
    C, MIN(D) D
  FROM
  (
    (
      SELECT
        C, D
      FROM
        ex
      WHERE
        C = 0
      ORDER BY
        D DESC
      LIMIT 10
    ) UNION (
      SELECT
        C, D
      FROM
        ex
      WHERE
        C = 1
      ORDER BY
        D DESC
      LIMIT 10
    )
  ) d1
  GROUP BY
    C
  ORDER BY
    C
) d2 ON d2.C = ex.C
WHERE
  ex.D < d2.D

After running the above query,

SELECT 
  C,
  COUNT(*),
  MIN(D),
  MAX(D)
FROM 
  ex
GROUP BY
  C
ORDER BY
  C

returns:

C   cnt MIN(D)                  MAX(D)
0   10  10/5/2012 2:14:53 AM    10/5/2012 7:21:23 PM
1   10  10/2/2012 1:41:21 PM    10/5/2012 2:57:34 PM

See SQL Fiddle for a working example.

Note that if you are deleting over 50% of the data, you may find it better to SELECT the records you want to keep into a new table, and then RENAME this table to your existing table.

Here's an example:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS ex_old;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS ex_new;
CREATE TABLE ex_new LIKE ex;

INSERT INTO
    ex_new
SELECT
    ex.*
FROM
    ex
INNER JOIN
(
  SELECT
    C, MIN(D) D
  FROM
  (
    (
      SELECT
        C, D
      FROM
        ex
      WHERE
        C = 0
      ORDER BY
        D DESC
      LIMIT 10
    ) UNION (
      SELECT
        C, D
      FROM
        ex
      WHERE
        C = 1
      ORDER BY
        D DESC
      LIMIT 10
    )
  ) d1
  GROUP BY
    C
  ORDER BY
    C
) d2 ON d2.C = ex.C
WHERE
  ex.D >= d2.D;

RENAME TABLE ex TO ex_old, ex_new TO ex;
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