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I am trying to initialize my custom vector object, but without using std::initializer_list. I am doing something like this:

template <typename T, std::size_t N>
struct vector
{
  template<std::size_t I = 0, typename ...Tp>
  typename std::enable_if<I == sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  unpack_tuple(std::tuple<Tp...> const& t)
  {
  }

  template<std::size_t I = 0, typename ...Tp>
  typename std::enable_if<I != sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  unpack_tuple(std::tuple<Tp...> const& t)
  {
    store[I] = std::get<I>(t);

    unpack_tuple<I + 1, Tp...>(t);
  }

  template<typename ...U>
  vector(U&&... args,
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_scalar<U...>::value, void>::type* = 0)
  {
    unpack_tuple(std::forward_as_tuple(std::forward<U>(args)...));
  }

  T store[N];
};

but the compiler does not grok the constructor unless I remove the std::enable_if argument, which I need (as I don't want non-scalar arguments). Does there exist a solution?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

std::is_scalar<U...>::value

The problem lies with the fact that is_scalar only takes a single type argument. You need to write a wrapper that combines multiple boolean values. I also wonder why you use perfect forwarding if you only want scalar types anyways - just pass them by-value. This way, you also don't need to worry about U being deduced as a reference when you get passed an lvalue.

#include <type_traits>

template<bool B>
using bool_ = std::integral_constant<bool, B>;

template<class Head, class... Tail>
struct all_of
  : bool_<Head::value && all_of<Tail...>::value>{};

template<class Head>
struct all_of<Head> : bool_<Head::value>{};

template<class C, class T = void>
using EnableIf = typename std::enable_if<C::value, T>::type;

// constructor
template<typename... U>
vector(U... args, EnableIf<all_of<std::is_scalar<U>...>>::type* = 0)
{
  unpack_tuple(std::tie(args...)); // tie makes a tuple of references
}

The above code should work. However, as an advice, if you don't want something, static_assert that you don't get it and don't abuse SFINAE for that. :) SFINAE should only be used in overloaded contexts.

// constructor
template<typename... U>
vector(U... args)
{
  static_assert(all_of<std::is_scalar<U>...>::value, "vector only accepts scalar types");
  unpack_tuple(std::tie(args...)); // tie makes a tuple of references
}

So much for your actual question, but I recommend a better way to unpack tuples (or variadic arguments in general, or even an array), using the indices trick:

template<unsigned...> struct indices{};
template<unsigned N, unsigned... Is> struct indices_gen : indices_gen<N-1, N-1, Is...>{};
template<unsigned... Is> struct indices_gen<0, Is...> : indices<Is...>{};

template<unsigned... Is, class... U>
void unpack_args(indices<Is...>, U... args){
  [](...){}((store[Is] = args, 0)...);
}

template<class... U>
vector(U... args){
  static_assert(all_of<std::is_scalar<U>...>::value, "vector only accepts scalar types");
  unpack_args(indices_gen<sizeof...(U)>(), args...);
}

What this code does is "abusing" the variadic unpacking mechanics. First, we generate a pack of indices [0 .. sizeof...(U)-1] and expand then this list in lockstep together with args. We put this expansion within a variadic (non-template) function argument list, as pack expansion can only occur at specific places, and this is one of them. Another possibility would be as a local array:

template<unsigned... Is, class... U>
void unpack_args(indices<Is...>, U... args){
  int a[] = {(store[Is] = args, 0)...};
  (void)a; // suppress unused variable warnings
}
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This is beautiful C++ at its finest. In my read-world program. there are multiple constructors the compiler can choose from, so IMO, use of SFINAE was justified. –  user1095108 Oct 8 '12 at 1:05

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