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I have a situation and it goes like this:

I need to print out coordinates like the one's used in a maths graph. So (0,0) (0,1) (0,2) and so on. So if the length is specified as 10 and breadth is specified as 20 then the graph region will be all the points from (0,0) till (10,20).

I wish to store these values in a table so that these can be printed out in order.

Later on, there is a scenario that some of these values will get removed so suppose the values removed are (4,5) (4,6) (4,7) and then the main table that was created earlier should not contain these values. And I need to be able to print out the new table with the remaining values.

Till now I have only done the coding to ask for the length and the breadth values.

How should I go ahead with the rest of this? In case you need any clarification or the question if too confusing then please leave a comment and I will try to make it better.

Any help will be very highly appreciated.

Thank you

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few ways of doing this depending on what you want.

The easy way is to use an array of arrays like this:

a = Array.new(11) {Array.new(21) {0}}

This creates an array like a[0][0] to a[10][20], with every item initialized to 0.

To remove an item, set it to nil:

a[4][5] = nil

When you print the array, skip any nil values:

for x in 0..10
  for y in 0..20
    next if a[x][y]==nil
    puts a[x][y]
  end
end

If your graph is very large, read about a "sparse matrix" which is how tools like Excel store many cells using less RAM for blank cells:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_matrix

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thank you for the answer.... This is exactly what I was looking for... Thank you for your help... –  abhishek dagar Oct 7 '12 at 19:43

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