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I have a class, TestMap, with only static methods (including a main) which is used to test Maps. There is a method in the class, as an example, which accepts a map and the types of the key and value are denoted as KeyType and ValueType respectively, as shown below;

public static <KeyType,ValueType> void printMap( String msg, Map<KeyType,ValueType> m )
{
    System.out.println( msg + ":" );
    Set<Map.Entry<KeyType,ValueType>> entries = m.entrySet( );

    for( Map.Entry<KeyType,ValueType> thisPair : entries )
    {
        System.out.print( thisPair.getKey( ) + ": " );
        System.out.println( thisPair.getValue( ) );
    }
}

My question is, if I want to re-write this class so that it can be instantiated, and not comprised of only static methods, how can I define a map within the class that could work with the Map<KeyType, ValueType>?

I tried to define a map as below, but it doesn't seem to work.

private Map<KeyType, ValueType> internalMap;

Any ideas?

Per the first comment, I tried to add to the class defnition, and then I setup a constructor as follows;

public class TestMap<KeyType, ValueType>
{
    private Map<KeyType, ValueType> internalMap;

    /*
     * Constructor which accepts a generic Map for testing
    */
    public <KeyType,ValueType> TestMap(Map<KeyType, ValueType> m)
    {
       this.internalMap = m;
    }       
}

However, the assignment in the constructor is throwing an error saying it is a Type Mismatch, and that it can't convert from java.util.Map to java.util.Map

share|improve this question
    
Don't repeat the type parameters on the constructor itself. See my answer. –  Ted Hopp Oct 7 '12 at 17:55
    
You don't need type parameters on the constructor. –  Tudor Oct 7 '12 at 17:56
    
@Chris Corbin: Please don't edit your question to be a new problem after the question is already marked as answered. You won't attract new answers (because the question looks like it's already answered) and it isn't fair to people who have already answered (because their answers no longer apply to your new question). Instead, just ask a new question by clicking the "Ask Question" button in the upper-right corner of the page. –  Daniel Pryden Oct 7 '12 at 20:04
    
Sorry, still new here. –  Chris Corbin Oct 7 '12 at 20:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can declare internalMap as you have tried, but since Map is an interface, you need to instantiate it with a concrete class type (e.g., HashMap, TreeMap, etc.)

public class TestMap<KeyType, ValueType> {
    private Map<KeyType, ValueType> internalMap;

    public TestMap() {
        internalMap = new HashMap<KeyType, ValueType>();
    }

    public TestMap(Map<KeyType, ValueType> m) {
        internalMap = m;
    }

    public void printMap( String msg )
    {
        System.out.println( msg + ":" );
        Set<Map.Entry<KeyType,ValueType>> entries = internalMap.entrySet( );

        for( Map.Entry<KeyType,ValueType> thisPair : entries )
        {
            System.out.print( thisPair.getKey( ) + ": " );
            System.out.println( thisPair.getValue( ) );
        }
    }

    . . . // methods to add to internal map, etc.
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if I want the constructor to accept a Map<KeyType, ValueType>, and then assign this to internalMap? –  Chris Corbin Oct 7 '12 at 17:55
    
@ChrisCorbin - Edited to show how it's done. Just eliminate the type parameters on the constructor declaration. –  Ted Hopp Oct 7 '12 at 17:56
1  
Thanks! My textbook had the following for the constructor; public <KeyType, ValueType> TestMap(Map<KeyType, ValueType m) { ... } When I removed the extra <KeyType, ValueType> afetr public it works. –  Chris Corbin Oct 7 '12 at 18:00
1  
Yeesh. What textbook is this? It ought to have a hazard label on it. –  Ted Hopp Oct 7 '12 at 18:04
    
Data Structures & Problem Solving using Java, 4th edition –  Chris Corbin Oct 7 '12 at 18:09

Do you mean this:

class MyMap<KeyType, ValueType> {
    private Map<KeyType, ValueType> internalMap;
}

Edit: You don't need type parameters on the constructor:

class TestMap<KeyType, ValueType>
{
    private Map<KeyType, ValueType> internalMap;

    /*
     * Constructor which accepts a generic Map for testing
    */
    public TestMap(Map<KeyType, ValueType> m)
    {
       this.internalMap = m;
    }       
}
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't OP say he tried this? –  Ted Hopp Oct 7 '12 at 17:47
1  
@Ted Hopp: He only said he tried the internal map definition and it "didn't work". I assume he missed the type parameters on the class itself. –  Tudor Oct 7 '12 at 17:48
    
@TedHopp : exactly, agreed –  Hayati Guvence Oct 7 '12 at 17:51
    
Okay, good inference. I assumed the problem was instantiating a generic map, but you're probably right (especially given OP's edit). –  Ted Hopp Oct 7 '12 at 17:53

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