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Trying to clean up some code and i wanted to know if the following is a safe way to cast uint16_t to a wchar_t.

#if ! defined(MARKUP_SIZEOFWCHAR)
#if __SIZEOF_WCHAR_T__ == 4 || __WCHAR_MAX__ > 0x10000
#define MARKUP_SIZEOFWCHAR 4
#else
#define MARKUP_SIZEOFWCHAR 2
#endif

void FileReader::parseBuffer(char * buffer, int length)
{
  //start by looking for a vrsn
  //Header seek around for a vrns followed by 32 bit size descriptor
  //read 32 bits at a time
  int cursor = 0;
  char vrsn[5] = "vrsn";
  cursor = this->searchForMarker(cursor, length, vrsn, buffer);
  int32_t size = this->getObjectSizeForMarker(cursor, length, buffer);
  cursor = cursor + 7; //advance cursor past marker and size
  wchar_t *version = this->getObjectForSizeAndCursor(size, cursor, buffer);
  wcout << version;
  delete[] version; //this pointer is dest from getObjectForSizeAndCursor
}

-

wchar_t* FileReader::getObjectForSizeAndCursor(int32_t size, int cursor, char *buffer) {

  int wlen = size/2;
  uint32_t *dest = new uint32_t[wlen+1];
  unsigned char *ptr = (unsigned char *)(buffer + cursor);
  for(int i=0; i<wlen; i++) {
    #if MARKUP_SIZEOFWCHAR == 4 // sizeof(wchar_t) == 4
      char padding[2] = {'\0','\0'}; 
      dest[i] =  (padding[0] << 24) + (padding[1] << 16) + (ptr[0] << 8) + ptr[1];
    #else // sizeof(wchar_t) == 2
      dest[i] = (ptr[0] << 8) + ptr[1];
    #endif
      ptr += 2;
      cout << ptr;
  }
  return (wchar_t *)dest;
}

do i have any scoping issues with the way i am using the padding? will i leak padding when i delete dest[] in the calling function?

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In what environment is wchar_t 32 bits? And what is he endianness of the two types you are converting between? –  David Grayson Oct 7 '12 at 17:58
    
You're using a uint32_t, not a uint16_t. So which are you trying to do? Also, it's hard to tell what your code is trying to actually accomplish. –  Nicol Bolas Oct 7 '12 at 17:59
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_character according to that it could be 16 or 32. i read it other places also. they said on some windows systems it might be 32 bytes. –  j_mcnally Oct 7 '12 at 18:01
    
the code works fine, i just want to make sure 1) im not leaking anything, 2) if i need to add padding for the uint32_t –  j_mcnally Oct 7 '12 at 18:09
1  
wchar_t is only required to hold 8 bits, and it can be signed or unsigned. So any use of it for larger values is not portable. And while I'm on the subject, uint16_t and uint32_t are not required to exist. Unless your program requires exactly 16 or 32 bits, use uint_least16_t or uint_fast16_t, and uint_least32_t or uint_fast32_t. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The distinction

#if MARKUP_SIZEOFWCHAR == 4 // sizeof(wchar_t) == 4
  char padding[2] = {'\0','\0'}; 
  dest[i] =  (padding[0] << 24) + (padding[1] << 16) + (ptr[0] << 8) + ptr[1];
#else // sizeof(wchar_t) == 2
  dest[i] = (ptr[0] << 8) + ptr[1];
#endif

is completely unnecessary. padding[i] is 0, so shifting that left keeps it 0, and adding it has no effect.

The compiler may or may not optimise the allocation of the two-byte array padding in each loop iteration away, but since it is an automatic array, it cannot leak in any way.

Since the types used in the loop are unsigned, simply using

dest[i] = (ptr[0] << 8) + ptr[1];

is perfectly safe. (The endianness must of course be correct.)

For

return (wchar_t *)dest;

you should let the type of dest depend on the size of wchar_t, it should be uint16_t* if sizeof(wchar_t) == 2 (and CHAR_BIT == 8).

share|improve this answer
    
so theres no chance the memory at those 2 bytes would be anything other than 0? –  j_mcnally Oct 7 '12 at 18:03
    
Not unless the compiler is blatantly violating the specs. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 7 '12 at 18:04
    
oops should i also declare the uint16/32 depending on the sizeofwchar? –  j_mcnally Oct 7 '12 at 18:04
    
i feel like i over looked that, since on some systems it might be 16 bits. –  j_mcnally Oct 7 '12 at 18:04
1  
Yup, everything in the loop is unsigned, so there's no danger of undefined behaviour due to overflow. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 7 '12 at 18:13

What you're trying to do isn't going to work. It's broken in several ways, but let's focus on the cast.

Your question doesn't match your code. Your code is using a uint32_t, while your question asks about a uint16_t. But that doesn't matter, because neither will work.

If you need to use wchar_t, then you should actually use wchar_t. If your goal is to take two consecutive bytes of a char* and copy them into the first-two bytes of a wchar_t, then just do that.

Here is a much better version of your code, one that actually works (to the degree that it makes sense to copy two bytes from a char* and pretend that it's a wchar_t):

std::wstring FileReader::getObjectForSizeAndCursor(int32_t size, int cursor, char *buffer) {

  int wlen = size/2;
  std::wstring out(wlen);
  unsigned char *ptr = (unsigned char *)(buffer + cursor);
  for(int i=0; i<wlen; i++) {
    out[i] = (ptr[0] << 8) + ptr[1];
    ptr += 2;
    cout << ptr;
  }
  return out;
}

Plus, there's no chance of memory leaking since we're using a proper RAII class like std::wstring.

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