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Ok, I was trying to implement memmove just as a programming exercise, and I get a memory access violation in the memmove function when I try to use malloc. Here is the function:

//Start

void* MYmemmove (void* destination, const void* source, size_t num) { 

    int* midbuf = (int *) malloc(num); // This is where the access violation happens.
    int* refdes = (int *) destination; // A pointer to destination, except it is casted to int*
    int* refsrc = (int *) source; // Same, except with source
    for (int i = 0;num >= i;i++) { 
        midbuf[i] = *(refsrc + i); // Copy source to midbuf
    }
    for (int i = 0;num >= i;i++) { 
        refdes[i] = *(midbuf + i); // Copy midbuf to destination
    } 
    free(midbuf); // free midbuf 
    refdes = NULL; // Make refdes not point to destination anymore
    refsrc = NULL; // Make refsrc not point to source anymore
    return destination;
}

By the way, I am sort of a newbie to pointers, so don't be suprised if there is some mistakes. What am I doing wrong?

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You don't need to cast the return value of malloc, or in fact any void pointer into any other pointer type. Still looking at your code, just an FYI. –  Dan Oct 7 '12 at 17:52
5  
@Dan: That is not true for C++, and the question has C++ tag as well. –  user405725 Oct 7 '12 at 17:52
2  
memmove takes a number of bytes, but you are using ints. –  Vaughn Cato Oct 7 '12 at 17:54
2  
The standard library implementation of memmove doesn't use an intermediate buffer. Also, setting refdes and refsrc to NULL at the end is pointless: the function is about to return, so they can't be used. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 17:59
4  
In addition to the malloc size problem, the comparison in the for loops is wrong; it should be num > i, not num >= i. And as a matter of style, i < num is the usual way of writing it. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Please be careful with the other suggestions! The answer depends on how your memmove will be used. The other answers state you should change your malloc call to account for the size of an int. However, if your memmove function will be used to mean "move this number of bytes" then the implementation would be wrong. I would instead go about using char* as that takes care of several problems in one go.

Also, an int is typically 4 bytes, and char is typically 1 byte. If the void* address you receive is not word aligned (not a multiple of 4 bytes), you will have a problem: To copy an int that is not word aligned you will have to do more than one read and expensive bit masking. This is inefficient.

Finally, the memory access violation happened because you were incrementing your midbuf int pointer each time, and moving forward 4 bytes at a time. However, you only allocated num bytes, and thus would eventually try to access past the end of the allocated region.

/** Moves num bytes(!) from source to destination */
void* MYmemmove (void* destination, const void* source, size_t num) { 

    // transfer buffer to account for memory aliasing
    // http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliasing_%28computing%29
    char * midbuf = (char *) malloc(num); // malloc allocates in bytes(!)
    char * refdes = (char *) destination;
    char * refsrc = (char *) source;

    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) { 
        midbuf[i] = *(refsrc + i); // Copy source to midbuf
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) { 
        refdes[i] = *(midbuf + i); // Copy midbuf to destination
    } 

    free(midbuf); // free midbuf
    // no need to set the pointers to NULL here.
    return destination;
}

By copying byte by byte, we avoid alignment issues, and cases where num itself could be not a multiple of 4 bytes (e.g. 3, so an int is too large for that move).

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1  
Also, both loops go one time too many. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:03
    
The loop limit is now correct. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:08
    
@PeteBecker yes thank you for pointing that out. –  Alexander Kondratskiy Oct 7 '12 at 18:08
    
Thanks, I have seen people use char in memory reads and writes for similar reasons; was just not too sure to use it. Thanks for clarifying. :) –  scrat101 Oct 7 '12 at 18:11
1  
Oh and BTW my function works now thanks to the suggestions. Thank you guys! –  scrat101 Oct 7 '12 at 18:19

Replace the string with malloc with this one:

int* midbuf = (int *) malloc(num*sizeof(int)); 

The problem is that you allocated not num elements of int but num bytes.

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If it's c casting return value of malloc is a bad idea. It can hide allocation failure –  fayyazkl Oct 7 '12 at 18:01
    
@fayyazkl: Uh how? The value would still be null. –  GManNickG Oct 7 '12 at 18:03
    
Well, yes, this fixes the internal buffer overrun. But the code still copies more bytes than it's supposed to. The original malloc call was correct; it's the pointer types that are wrong. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:09
    
@GManNickG If malloc is not correctly prototyped (which is often possible if you are building on an embedded platform with library compiling along), casting the return value won't fix anything. malloc() will still return int, and casting that int to an object pointer type isn't magically going to change it to a pointer. Casting malloc() will make the compiler think it's not broken, although it really is when an int is being returned. –  fayyazkl Oct 7 '12 at 18:19
1  
@fayyazkl - it depends. <g> If an int and a pointer are the same size, the cast works just fine. That's the old C heritage from the days before function prototypes. On some systems these days an int and a pointer are different sizes, and the cast does, as you say, hide a problem. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:47
int* midbuf = (int *) malloc(num); // This is where the access violation happens.
int* refdes = (int *) destination; // A pointer to destination, except it is casted to int*
int* refsrc = (int *) source; // Same, except with source
for (int i = 0;num >= i;i++) { 
    midbuf[i] = *(refsrc + i); // Copy source to midbuf
}

You malloc only num bytes, but in the loop, you try to copy num ints. Since an int usually takes more than one byte, you're accessing out of bounds.

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memory access violation?

You are trying to access memory you are not entitled to access. Maybe you have a null pointer or the pointer is pointing into another program or the code segment.

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But specifically where? –  minitech Oct 7 '12 at 18:00
    
If you have a pointer pointing to say, 0x00000000 and you access it and it gives you a memory access violation, then that is the pointer and where it is pointing to...specifically. Note, it doesn't have to be 0x00000000, it could be any address outside of your program. –  Steve Wellens Oct 8 '12 at 1:06

The problem is that you're mallocing num bytes into midbuf, and then copying num ints into it. Since an int is larger than a byte on most platforms, you have a problem. Change your malloc to num*sizeof(int) and you won't have that problem.

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-1 - the third argument to memmove specifies the number of bytes to move. The malloc is correct; the pointer types are wrong. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:11
    
as above - the answer is correct, depending on how you understand the question. –  Zane Oct 7 '12 at 18:25
    
Well, only if MYmemmove is the same as memmove. One way or another, he has a problem. –  Dan Oct 7 '12 at 18:27
    
@Dan - "I was trying to implement memmove just as a programming exercise". –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:44

There are two problems to be looked at

1. Memory space

(provided that MYmemmove does a custom implementation to move ints as the question suggests)

    int* midbuf = (int *) malloc(num * sizeof(int));

malloc is byte based, and will allocate num bytes. int * is a pointer to ints. Meaning midbuf[x] will access the memory from midbuf + sizeof(int)*x. You want to allocate num ints instead (the size of an int depends on architectures, it is usually 4 or 2 bytes). Thus the malloc(num * sizeof(int)).

2. Array indexes

    for (int i = 0;num > i;i++) { 

in C (and C++) arrays are 0-based, i.e. the first index is 0. You did it correctly. But that means also that if you reserve num ints, the useable indexes will be from 0 to num-1. In your loops, i will vary from 0 to num, thanks to the condition num >= i, meaning you will access num+1 items. So num > i (or i < num) would be a better for condition.

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-1 - the third argument to memmove says how many bytes to move. The malloc call is correct; it's the pointer types that are wrong. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:12
    
The actual memmove function moves bytes. It is not clear from the initial question that MYmemmove is not a custom version to move ints instead. I edited my answer to take this into account. –  ring0 Oct 7 '12 at 18:18
1  
The above answer is correct when looking at the question: why did the memory violation happen? Pete is correct when it comes to "what is a proper way to implement mmove". –  Zane Oct 7 '12 at 18:22
    
@ring0 - it is quite clear: "I was trying to implement memmove just as a programming exercise". –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:25
#include <stdlib.h>  // did you included this?


void* MYmemmove (void* destination, const void* source, size_t num) { 

    char *Source = source, *Destination = destination;
    char *Middle = malloc( sizeof(char) * num );    // midbuf

    for (int i = 0; i < num ; i++) { 
        Middle[i] = Destination[i]; // Copy source to midbuf
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < num ; i++) { 
        Destination[i] = Middle[i]; // Copy midbuf to destination
    }

    free(Middle);                   // free memory allocated previously with malloc
    return destination;
}

Acces violation could occur because you didn't included libraries needed for malloc (standard c doesn't throw errors in your face if you forgot a function definition). You don't need to mark pointers as NULL since there's no garbage collection in C (pointers are just that - pointers. Addresses to a point in memory, not memory themselves).

think about pointers like

addres of pointer 0x1243 0x4221 Destination -> {some kind of data}

Destination = 0x1243 *Destination = whatever value is currently at addres 0x4221

You can't also index void pointers. You must first cast them to some type, so the compiler knows how much offset they need.

Destination[x] = *(Destination+x)

a char is 1 byte, so char pointer will really get moved by x bytes, but an int is 4 bytes, and an int pointer will get moved by 4*x bytes. Don't worry too much if it sounds technical, it'll be important when you'll get to something really low level ;)

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1  
-1 memmove works even when the two arrays overlap; this implementation will create nonsense in that case. –  Pete Becker Oct 7 '12 at 18:04
    
@PeteBecker indeed! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliasing_%28computing%29 –  Alexander Kondratskiy Oct 7 '12 at 18:07
    
@Pete fixed that –  kuniqs Oct 7 '12 at 19:28

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