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I want to use anonymous class for runnable. There are two way, but I don't know does it same or not :

Method one : using directly Runnable and call run

new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
    }
}.run();

Method two : create anonymous runnable, and paste to Thread, using start method instead of run :

new Thread( new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
    }
}).start();

I think method two is obvious true. But, I don't know does it same with method one ? Does we can call run method on Runnable directly ?

Thanks :)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, you usually won't call run() directly on a Runnable as you will get no background threading that way. If you don't want and need a background thread, then fine call run() directly, but otherwise if you want to create a background thread and run your Runnable from within it, you must create a new Thread and then pass in the Runnable into its constructor, and call start().

Also, there are other ways of accomplishing this task including use of Executors and ExecutorServices, and you should look into the uses of this as they offer more flexibility and power than using a bare bones Thread object.

Also you'll want to have a look at use of the Future interface and the FutureTasks class that are like Runnables only they allow you to return a result when complete. If you've used a SwingWorker, then you've already used a Future interface without realizing it.

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As the others have mentioned, using the Thread class is the correct way. However, you should also look in to using Javas Executors framework to handle running threads.

Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor().execute(new Runnable() {
    @Override 
    public void run() {
        // code in here
    }
});

Of course, just using Thread directly is fine. But it is generally advised (or preferred) to use the framework. Let Java handle the fine details for you.

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Your method 1 doesn't make sens. The Runnable interface is meaningful to threading only when executed inside a Thread (your method 2). If you want to find another way to wrap inline, a chunk of code inside a Thread, this might be one:

Thread t = new Thread()
{
     public void run()
     {
        // put whatever code you want to run inside the thread here.
     }
};
t.start();
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The first way is wrong : it doesn't create a new thread so it's useless.

It's just like putting the code outside of a runnable.

Note that there are two ways of launching a new thread on code defined in an anonymous class, as described in Thread's javadoc but your method 1 isn't among them and your method 2 is the one you should usually prefer.

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As @Hovercraft mentionds, if you call a Runnable.run() method directly, a Thread is not created at all. It's just like calling any other method (System.out.println(...), ...).

When you pass a Runnable object to the Thread constructor, that sets the target field in the Thread to be your object:

this.target = target;

Then when you call start() on the Thread, this does the work of forking the new thread and calling the Thread.run() method. The Thread.run() calls the target's run() method in turn:

public void run() {
    if (target != null) {
        target.run();
    }
}

So passing the Runnable to a Thread and then calling start() is the way to run your Runnable in the background in a separate thread.

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I would like to add something on this discussion (you already got good answers).
If your Runnable object is stateless, in order to reduce memory allocations (which take time + consume some memory - think about a case an application vastly uses threads) - please consider having the a static field holding the runnable object.

private static Runnable runnable = new Runnable() { //Once again - do this only if this is a statelss object!
   public void run() {
   }
} 

//Use the runnable somewhere in the code
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