Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to return first (first met, from left to right) non repeating element in an array.

i come with an algorithm that return smallest integer that is non repeating in an array quite easily, using only a array as extra space with length the max integer value in the array:

// smallest non repeating integer

int firstNonRepeatingInteger(int* input, int n)
{

     max = std::numeric_limits<int>::min() ;

     for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
     {
        if(input[i] > max)  
            max = input[i];
     }

     int* count = new int[max];

     for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++)
          count[input[i]] += 1 ;

     int j = 0;
     while(count[i] != 1)
       j++ ; 

     if(j < n)
        return input[count[j]] ;
     else
        return -1 ;

}

however, i cannot find an algorithm to find the first met, except having another n-array storing the time an integer is encountered.

any idea ? any other implementation of first algorithm?

thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Something like std::find_if_not and comparing with the first element would work. –  chris Oct 7 '12 at 18:31
1  
Are you happy to loop through the array again? If so then just return input[i] the first time count[input[i]]==1 –  Peter de Rivaz Oct 7 '12 at 18:37
    
Going with the find_if_not, if you can use it, here's a sample. –  chris Oct 7 '12 at 19:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You almost had it:

#include <limits>
#include <iostream>

int firstNonRepeatingInteger(int* input, int n)
{
  int min = std::numeric_limits<int>::max() ;
  int max = std::numeric_limits<int>::min() ;

  // Find min/max values in input array.
  for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
  {
    if (input[i] > max)
      max = input[i];
    if (input[i] < min)
      min = input[i];
  }

  int* count;
  if (max - min + 1 > n)
  {
    count = new int[max - min + 1];
    // count has more elements than input, so only initialize
    // those elements which will be used.
    for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
      count[input[i] - min] = 0;
  }
  else
  {
    // Just initialize everything which is more efficient if
    // count has less elements than input.
    count = new int[max - min + 1]();
  }

  // Count number of occurrences.
  for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    ++count[input[i] - min];

  // Find first non repeating element and return its index,
  // or -1 if there is none.
  int index = -1;
  for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
  {
    if (count[input[i] - min] == 1)
    {
      index = i;
      break;
    }
  }
  delete[] count;
  return index;
}

int main()
{
  int values[5] = {-2, 4, 6, 4, -2};
  int index = firstNonRepeatingInteger(values, 5);
  if (index >= 0)
  {
    std::cout << "Found first non repeating integer " << values[index] <<
      " at index " << index << "." << std::endl;
  }
  else
    std::cout << "Found no non repeating integer in array." << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

Note that your code had several issues:

  • You never deleted the allocated memory.
  • new int[max] does not initialize the array with zeros. You need to use new int[max]() instead. Note the empty parentheses which will set all elements to zero (see ISO C++03 5.3.4[expr.new]/15).
  • Negative values in the input array will result in memory access violations.
share|improve this answer
    
Note: If n is the size of the array, then the algorithm is not O(n). It is O(n+k) where k is the size of the range of integers. –  Vaughn Cato Oct 7 '12 at 19:54
    
Well ok if min and max are far off each other you may change initialization of the count array with int* count = new int[max - min + 1]; for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) count[input[i] - min] = 0; Depends on the input if this is more efficient or not. –  Stacker Oct 7 '12 at 20:05
    
@Stacker thanks thats it, i oversaw that you have to retrieve the first met simply iterating on input instead of count. –  antitrust Oct 8 '12 at 5:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.