Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i am trying to make a queue library that is based on a linked list library i already made. specifically i am having troubles updating the tail pointer in the queue structure after i add a new node to the linked list.

linked list structure:

struct listNode {
    int nodeLength;
    int nodeValue;
    struct listNode *next;
};

typedef struct listNode node;

queue structure:

struct QueueRecord {
    node *list;
    node *front;
    node *back;
    int maxLen;
};
typedef struct QueueRecord queue;

so here is my add function in the queue library

void add(queue currentQueue, int data){
    addTail(currentQueue.list, data, data+5);
    currentQueue.back = currentQueue.back->next;

}

and the addTail function from the linked list library

void addTail (node *head, int value, int length) {
    node *current = head;
    node *newNode = (struct listNode *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    newNode = initNode(value, length);

    while (current->next != NULL)   
        current = current->next;

    newNode->next = NULL;
    current->next = newNode;
}

so again my problem is the tail pointer is not getting set to the last node in the list. it is remaining in the same place as the head pointer. ive been researching this for hours trying to see if im just missing something small but i cant find it. if more code or explanation is needed to understand my problem i can provide it.

how a queue is created:

queue createQueue(int maxLen){
    queue newQueue;
    newQueue.list = createList();
    newQueue.front = newQueue.list;
    newQueue.back = newQueue.list;
    newQueue.maxLen = maxLen;
    return newQueue;
}    

node *createList (){
    node *head = NULL;
    head = (struct listNode *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    head->next = NULL;
    return head;
}

node *initNode (int value, int length){
    node *newNode = NULL;
    newNode = (struct listNode *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    newNode->nodeValue = value;
    newNode->nodeLength = length;
    newNode->next = NULL;
    return newNode;
}
share|improve this question
    
Added working sample to my answer. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 7 '12 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
void add(queue currentQueue, int data){

You are passing a copy of the queue struct to add, so only the copy's members are changed. You need to pass a queue* to the function to be able to change the members of the queue itself.

void add(queue *currentQueue, int data){
    if (currentQueue == NULL) {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    addTail(currentQueue->list, data, data+5);
    currentQueue->back = currentQueue->back->next;
}

and call it as add(&your_queue);

In your addTail function, you should check whether head is NULL too.

And with

node *newNode = (struct listNode *)malloc(sizeof(node));
newNode = initNode(value, length);

in addTail, you have a serious problem. With the assignment newNode = initNode(value, length);, you are losing the reference to the just malloced memory.

If initNode mallocs a new chunk of memory, it's "just" a memory leak, then you should remove the malloc in addTail.

Otherwise, I fear initNode returns the address of a local variable, à la

node * initNode(int val, int len) {
    node new;
    new.nodeValue = val;
    new.nodeLength = len;
    new.next = NULL;
    return &new;
}

If initNode looks similar to that, that would cause a problem since the address becomes invalid as soon as the function returns. But your compiler should have warned you, if initNode looked like that.

Anyway, without seeing the code for initNode, I can't diagnose the cause.

But if you change your addTail to

void addTail (node *head, int value, int length) {
    if (head == NULL) { // violation of contract, die loud
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    node *current = head;
    node *newNode = malloc(sizeof(node));
    if (newNode == NULL) {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE); // or handle gracefully if possible
    }
    newNode->nodeValue = value;
    newNode->nodeLength = length;
    newNode->next = NULL;

    while (current->next != NULL)   
        current = current->next;

    current->next = newNode;
}

it should work.

However, since you have pointers to the first and the last node in the list, it would be more efficient to use the back pointer to append a new node,

void add(queue *currentQueue, int data){
    node *newNode = malloc(sizeof *newNode);
    if (newNode == NULL) {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE); // or handle gracefully if possible
    }
    newNode->nodeValue = data;
    newNode->nodeLength = data+5;
    newNode->next = NULL;
    currentQueue->back->next = newNode;
    currentQueue->back = newNode;
}

since you needn't traverse the entire list to find the end.


A simple sample programme

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct listNode {
    int nodeLength;
    int nodeValue;
    struct listNode *next;
};

typedef struct listNode node;

struct QueueRecord {
    node *list;
    node *front;
    node *back;
    int maxLen;
};
typedef struct QueueRecord queue;

node *createList (){
    node *head = NULL;
    head = (struct listNode *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    head->next = NULL;
    return head;
}

void addTail (node *head, int value, int length) {
    if (head == NULL) { // violation of contract, die loud
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    node *current = head;
    node *newNode = malloc(sizeof(node));
    if (newNode == NULL) {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE); // or handle gracefully if possible
    }
    newNode->nodeValue = value;
    newNode->nodeLength = length;
    newNode->next = NULL;

    while (current->next != NULL)   
        current = current->next;

    current->next = newNode;
}

queue createQueue(int maxLen){
    queue newQueue;
    newQueue.list = createList();
    newQueue.front = newQueue.list;
    newQueue.back = newQueue.list;
    newQueue.maxLen = maxLen;
    return newQueue;
}

void add(queue *currentQueue, int data){
    if (currentQueue == NULL) {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    addTail(currentQueue->list, data, data+5);
    currentQueue->back = currentQueue->back->next;
}

int main(void) {
    queue myQ = createQueue(10);
    for(int i = 1; i < 6; ++i) {
        add(&myQ, i);
        printf("list:  %p\nfront: %p\nback:  %p\n",
                (void*)myQ.list, (void*)myQ.front, (void*)myQ.back);
    }
    node *curr = myQ.front->next;
    while(curr) {
        printf("Node %d %d, Back %d %d\n", curr->nodeValue,
                 curr->nodeLength, myQ.back->nodeValue, myQ.back->nodeLength);
        curr = curr->next;
    }
    while(myQ.list) {
        myQ.front = myQ.front->next;
        free(myQ.list);
        myQ.list = myQ.front;
    }
    return 0;
}

works as expected, also with the alternative add implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't it so, that in standard plain c, all structs are passd by reference? –  Peter Miehle Oct 7 '12 at 19:08
    
No, everything is passed by value, but for arrays, a pointer to the first element is passed. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 7 '12 at 19:10
    
sure? so when I have sizeof(queue) := 5000 and i call fun(queue), 5000 bytes are COPYed (as you write) onto the stack? we are in C not in an onbject oriented environment, where a "copy" is put on the stack –  Peter Miehle Oct 7 '12 at 19:12
    
Yes, that's it. You should pass large things by pointer for that reason. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 7 '12 at 19:14
    
ok i did have it set up like that before and it was causing me problems but the explanation helped me so thanks. now im not sure what my tail is pointing to because when i print the list from there it prints nothing when it should print just the last node. –  Tristan Pearce Oct 7 '12 at 19:23

i think you never initialized back, so back->next is some random pointer?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.