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I am learning java myself these days. This function is to calculate the Combination. However, I found that there is a very small limit of the number n and k in this function. Each time if I type a large n or k, for instance, 100, it gives me

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArithmeticException: / by zero
at Combination.combination(Combination.java:29)
at Combination.main(Combination.java:47)

Or gives me a negative number...

Is there a way to make it work for large number like 10000?

Thanks!

import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Map;

public class Combination {

private Map<Long,Long> factorialMap = new HashMap<Long,Long>();

public Long getFactorial(int number) {
    Long val = factorialMap.get(number);
    if(val != null) {
        return val;
    } else {
        val = getFactorialRecursive(number);
        factorialMap.put((long) number, val);
        return val;
    }
}

public Long getFactorialRecursive(int number) {
    if(number == 1 || number == 0) {
        return 1L;
    } else {
        return number * getFactorialRecursive(number-1);
    }
}

public Long combination(int fromVal, int chooseVal) {
    return getFactorial(fromVal)/(getFactorial(chooseVal)*getFactorial(fromVal-chooseVal));
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
    int   n, k;
    Combination comb = new Combination();
    java.util.Scanner console = new java.util.Scanner(System.in);

    while (true)  // will break with k > n or illegal k or n
    {  System.out.print ("Value for n:  ");
       n = console.nextInt();
       if ( n < 0 ) break;
       System.out.print ("Value for k:  ");
       k = console.nextInt();;
       if ( k > n || k < 0 )
          break;
       System.out.print(n +" choose " + k + " = ");
       System.out.println(comb.combination(n,k));
    }
    console.nextLine();    // Set up for "Press ENTER...


} }
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I have a feeling that a recursive factorial function will stackoverflow on 10000. –  Mysticial Oct 7 '12 at 19:28
    
@Mysticial: That actually depends on the stack size you set for the JVM. –  Kim Stebel Oct 7 '12 at 19:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should use the BigInteger object: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/math/BigInteger.html

In particular, your problem is that 21! is too large for even a long and therefore overflows. Another option would be to use a double, but that will lose precision, so if you need integer accuracy BigInteger is the way to go.

Using BigInteger you will need to convert your integer to BigInteger:

BigInteger bi = new BigInteger(intVal+"");

Then use the add, multiply, divide and subtract (amongst others) to manipulate your values (like):

bi = bi.add(bi2);

Then you can use the method longValue() to get the value back (assuming it fits in a long):

return bi.longValue();
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1  
I would use a reference from Java 7. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 7 '12 at 19:23
    
    
Thanks so much but can you give me some clues about how to use BigInt please...I tried but failed. Looks like bigInteger is not something like int long or double at all... –  jackhao Oct 7 '12 at 19:33
    
@jackhao Added some details. –  CrazyCasta Oct 7 '12 at 19:39
    
Thanks for your help. –  jackhao Oct 7 '12 at 19:55

I suggest you consider that Java will not recurse more than about 10,000 times by default and you don't need to calculate such large factorials in the first place.

e.g. 1000!/999! is 1000

If you use a loop you can stop much earlier.

public static BigInteger combination(int n, int r) {
    if (r * 2 > n) r = n - r;
    BigInteger num = BigInteger.ONE;
    BigInteger nr = BigInteger.valueOf(n - r);
    for (int i = n; i > r; i--) {
        num = num.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(i));
        while (nr.compareTo(BigInteger.ONE) > 0 && num.mod(nr).equals(BigInteger.ZERO)) {
            num = num.divide(nr);
            nr = nr.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
        }
    }
    while (nr.compareTo(BigInteger.ONE) > 0) {
        num = num.divide(nr);
        nr = nr.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
    }
    return num;
}

BTW I wouldn't use Long when I mean to use long as it less efficient.

For comparison I have included the same code using long.

public static long combination2(int n, int r) {
    if (r * 2 > n) r = n - r;
    long num = 1;
    int nr = n - r;
    for (int i = n; i > r; i--) {
        num *= i;
        while (nr > 1 && num % nr == 0) {
            num /= nr--;
        }
    }
    while (nr > 1)
        num /= nr--;
    return num;
}
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