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I have to connect to a third party web service that provides no wsdl nor asmx. The url of the service is just http://server/service.soap

I have read this article about raw services calls, but I'm not sure if this is what I'm looking for.

Also, I've asked for wsdl files, but being told that there are none (and there won't be).

I'm using C# with .net 2.0, and can't upgrade to 3.5 (so no WCF yet). I think that third party is using java, as that's the example they have supplied.

Thanks in advance!

UPDATE Get this response when browsing the url:

<SOAP-ENV:Envelope>
<SOAP-ENV:Body>
<SOAP-ENV:Fault>
<faultcode>SOAP-ENV:Server</faultcode>
<faultstring>
Cannot find a Body tag in the enveloppe
</faultstring>
</SOAP-ENV:Fault>
</SOAP-ENV:Body>
</SOAP-ENV:Envelope>
share|improve this question
    
You should post one or more of the Java example files somewhere, then post the link to them here. One possibility is snipt.org. –  John Saunders Aug 14 '09 at 21:33
    
I've managed to get to connect the webservice, as soon as I have some time I'll post how to do it. Thanks for your interest! –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 18 '09 at 12:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Well, I finally got this to work, so I'll write here the code I'm using. (Remember, .Net 2.0, and no wsdl to get from web service).

First, we create an HttpWebRequest:

public static HttpWebRequest CreateWebRequest(string url)
{
    HttpWebRequest webRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
    webRequest.Headers.Add("SOAP:Action");
    webRequest.ContentType = "text/xml;charset=\"utf-8\"";
    webRequest.Accept = "text/xml";
    webRequest.Method = "POST";
    return webRequest;
}

Next, we make a call to the webservice, passing along all values needed. As I'm reading the soap envelope from a xml document, I'll handle the data as a StringDictionary. Should be a better way to do this, but I'll think about this later:

public static XmlDocument ServiceCall(string url, int service, StringDictionary data)
{
    HttpWebRequest request = CreateWebRequest(url);

    XmlDocument soapEnvelopeXml = GetSoapXml(service, data);

    using (Stream stream = request.GetRequestStream())
    {
        soapEnvelopeXml.Save(stream);
    }

    IAsyncResult asyncResult = request.BeginGetResponse(null, null);

    asyncResult.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne();

    string soapResult;
    using (WebResponse webResponse = request.EndGetResponse(asyncResult))
    using (StreamReader rd = new StreamReader(webResponse.GetResponseStream()))
    {
        soapResult = rd.ReadToEnd();
    }

    File.WriteAllText(HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("/servicios/" + DateTime.Now.Ticks.ToString() + "assor_r" + service.ToString() + ".xml"), soapResult);

    XmlDocument resp = new XmlDocument();

    resp.LoadXml(soapResult);

    return resp;
}

So, that's all. If anybody thinks that GetSoapXml must be added to the answer, I'll write it down. Thanks for the help!

share|improve this answer
    
Great job. 2 years later, but I found this very useful. :) –  Totty Aug 4 '11 at 21:12
3  
Would love to see this GetSoapXml too, please :) –  user324365 Feb 7 '12 at 0:37
1  
please show getsoapxml –  frank Feb 5 '13 at 10:37
    
I'm not sure if still have it, but will look for it and post it as soon as I find it. –  MaLKaV_eS Mar 4 '13 at 10:00

In my opinion, there is no excuse for a SOAP web service to not supply a WSDL. It need not be dynamically generated by the service; it need not be available over the Internet. But there must be a WSDL, even if they have to send it to you on a floppy disk!

If you have any ability to complain to the providers of this service, then I urge you to do so. If you have the ability to push back, then do so. Ideally, switch service providers, and tell these people it's because they didn't provide a WSDL. At the very least, find out why they don't think it's important.

share|improve this answer
    
The XML scheme to send and retrieve information are documented. The only thing I lack is the knowledge to connect to it properly. As for the company providing it, is an insurance company, so no possibility to complain :( –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 14 '09 at 17:52
1  
Actually, I strongly disagree with that. Are these schemas part of any industry-standard, from an industry standards organization (international or not). If so, this gives you a single point to press on, and an industry full of other developers who could join with you in pushing. It's not like you're asking them to do something very complicated or expensive, especially if they already have a mechanism for distributing the schemas. Even if it's specific to the company, once they've got the schemas, the rest is pretty easy. –  John Saunders Aug 14 '09 at 18:05
    
Any luck finding out why they don't want to provide a WSDL? Maybe you should get a trial of XMLspy, and show them how easy it would be, since they've already got the XML schemas. –  John Saunders Aug 19 '09 at 6:58

Hmm, tricky one here but not impossible but I'll do my best to explian it.

What you'll need to do is

  1. Create serializable classes that match the object schemas you're dealing with on the third party service.
  2. Find out if they use any SOAPAction in their service calls
  3. See if you can create an asmx which mimics their service in terms of being able to handle requests and responses (this will be good for testing your client app if their service is down)
  4. You can then create a service proxy from your dummy service and change the service url when calling the third party service.
  5. If something doesnt work in your client, then you can tweak your dummy service, re-generate the proxy and try again.

I will try to add more as and when I think of it but that should be enough to get you started.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll look for information about this, but please, post any information you think is usefull. –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 14 '09 at 11:09
    
Yeah, hope they even have XML schema for this. OTOH, if you're going to do anything with a dummy service, don't do anything with ASMX - use WCF instead. –  John Saunders Aug 14 '09 at 16:07
    
Is WCF compatible with 2.0? I think it could only be used with 3.0 –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 14 '09 at 17:54
    
Sorry, forgot you're stuck in the ancient past. You have to use ASMX, even if Microsoft is no longer fixing bugs in it. –  John Saunders Aug 14 '09 at 18:08

If you're lucky you could still get the wsdl. Some web service frameworks allow you to retrieve a dynamically generated WSDL.

Web Services written with Axis1.x allow you to retrieve a dynamically generated WSDL file by browsing to the URL.

Just browse to

http://server/service.soap/?wsdl

I don't know if this is possible with other frameworks though.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried this, didn't work. Thanks anyway :) –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 14 '09 at 10:56
    
thought it was a bit of a long shot. Do you know that framework (if any) the service is written in? If there is no WSDL then how are you supposed to use this service? Do they have any guidelines for you? –  Glen Aug 14 '09 at 11:04
    
They have submited some .java files as example, but as I do know nothing of Java... –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 14 '09 at 14:53

Add it over VisualStudio as Web Reference.

But note - that studio will update this each time project opens. That is why my favorite way - to create this web reference and after it include generated files as regular .cs (obviously don't forget to exclude web reference).

share|improve this answer
1  
I should have said that I've already tried this, with no luck. VisualStudio does not recognice the url of the web service as a valid document. I'll try to put the error message later, as i'm currently using spanish version of vs. –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 14 '09 at 10:56
    
are you sure that service exists at specified address? can you browse it? May be this is not SOAP (but native format over XML) –  Dewfy Aug 14 '09 at 11:53
    
Yes, I get a soap response when I tried to navigate to the service URL. –  MaLKaV_eS Aug 14 '09 at 15:05
    
-1: He said there is no WSDL. –  John Saunders Aug 14 '09 at 15:58

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