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Note: I also posted this question on the AngularJS mailing list here: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/angular/UC8_pZsdn2U

Hi All,

I'm building my first AngularJS app and am not very familiar with Javascript to begin with so any guidance will be much appreciated :)

My App has two controllers, ClientController and CountryController. In CountryController, I'm retrieving a list of countries from a CountryService that uses the $resource object. This works fine, but I want to be able to share the list of countries with the ClientController. After some research, I read that I should use the CountryService to store the data and inject that service into both controllers.

This was the code I had before:

CountryService:

services.factory('CountryService', function($resource) {
    return $resource('http://localhost:port/restwrapper/client.json', {port: ':8080'});
});

CountryController:

//Get list of countries         
//inherently async query using deferred promise
$scope.countries = CountryService.query(function(result){       
        //preselected first entry as default
    $scope.selected.country = $scope.countries[0];  
});

And after my changes, they look like this:

CountryService:

services.factory('CountryService', function($resource) {
    var countryService = {};

    var data;
    var resource = $resource('http://localhost:port/restwrapper/country.json', {port: ':8080'});

    var countries = function() {
        data = resource.query();
        return data;
    }

    return {
        getCountries: function() {
            if(data) {
                console.log("returning cached data");
                return data;
            } else {
                console.log("getting countries from server");
                return countries(); 
            }

        }
    };
  });

CountryController:

$scope.countries = CountryService.getCountries(function(result){
        console.log("i need a callback function here...");
});

The problem is that I used to be able to use the callback function in $resource.query() to preselect a default selection, but now that I've moved the query() call to within my CountryService, I seemed to have lost what.

What's the best way to go about solving this problem?

Thanks for your help, Shaun

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok..so looks like I solved the problem by passing a callback function all the way up to the resource.query() call. Still not sure if this is the best way to do this.

For reference, this is what I did:

CountryController:

$scope.countries = CountryService.getCountries(function(){
    //preselected default
    $scope.selected.country = $scope.countries[0];  
});

CountryService:

//Country Service. Will contain all relevant rest methods here
services.factory('CountryService', function($resource) {
    var countryService = {};

    var data;
    var resource = $resource('http://localhost:port/restwrapper/country.json', {port: ':8080'});

    var countries = function(callback) {
        data = resource.query(callback);
        return data;
    }


    return {
        getCountries: function(callback) {
            if(data) {
                console.log("returning cached data");
                return data;
            } else {
                console.log("getting countries from server");
                return countries(callback); 
            }

        }
    };
  });
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You should take a look at the $q service, you can do:

promise.then(callback);

From 1.1.3, you can access promises with $then, for exemple resource.query().$then(callback);

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Actually, prior to angular 1.1.3, $resource methods by default don't return promises, but $http methods do. –  alalonde May 7 '13 at 19:50
    
Thx I corrected the answer –  Guillaume86 May 7 '13 at 20:09

In this new scenario you could use a $scope.$watch. The way you use it is as follows.

$scope.countries = CountryService.getCountries();

$scope.$watch('countries',function(newValue){
//need to check if newValue has a value because 
//the first time watch fires it will be undefined.
    if(newValue && newValue.length > 0 ){
        $scope.selected.country = $scope.countries[0];
    }
});

Hope this helps.

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One potential problem that I've found when using watchers like this, is that if you plan on doing any modification of that object later on, the watcher will continue to fire. Sometimes this is desirable, other times you end up with code running many, many times when it doesn't need to. In some cases you can get around this by using if(newValue === oldValue) return; or even using $broadcast and $on instead of $watch. –  fractalspawn Feb 6 at 1:37

AngularJS has its own way of caching queries, which you should use. As for the callback, it's no use assigning the query to a variable, since a promise will be returned anyway. You should simply always expect a promise, and pass your callback inside success or finally.

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