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Just out of curiosity:

How could this (rather ugly) Rails code be prettified / refactored:

def section_link(name, path)    
  link = link_to(name, path) 
  if name != controller.controller_name.titlecase
    link
  else
    link_to(name, path, :class => 'current')
  end
end  
share|improve this question
    
We have a sister site that answers code review questions: codereview.stackexchange.com - if you want I can migrate your question over there and you might get some more answers, one of which could be even better than the accepted one. – Kev Oct 7 '12 at 23:27
up vote 6 down vote accepted
def section_link(name, path)
  options = {}
  options[:class] = 'current' if name == controller_name.titlecase
  link_to name, path, options
end
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, this one got the most votes, so I decided to go for it. Thanks! – Tintin81 Oct 7 '12 at 20:27
    
not bad... but some programmers will chinge at this options being first {} and modified afterwards. Note that you can write the completely equivalent one-liner expression options = name == controller_name.titlecase ? {:class => 'current'} : {} – tokland Oct 7 '12 at 20:33
    
@tokland I'm not sure. If it were changing options to something else altogether, then I'd agree with you that initializing it to one value then changing it to another would be pretty yuk! (say it could either be 42 or "the answer") – Andrew Haines Oct 7 '12 at 22:28
    
@Andy. At least it does not change its type, granted. But a question: when doing maths, if you write x = 1, do you change x, to let's say 2, afterwards in the same scope? No, that wouldn't make any sense. Why does it make sense when programming (which is just math in action)? (my point: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_programming). – tokland Oct 7 '12 at 22:38

I'd write:

def section_link(name, path)
  is_current = (name == controller.controller_name.titlecase)
  link_to(name, path, :class => ('current' if is_current))
end

Justification: 1) The variable is_current makes the code somewhat more declarative. 2) link_to assumes that nil means empty class (what we want here).

share|improve this answer
    
+1, real added value here. – apneadiving Oct 7 '12 at 20:13
    
Thanks, looks really good! – Tintin81 Oct 7 '12 at 20:28

You could do something like this:

def section_link(name, path)
  link_to(name, path, class: name == controller.controller_name.titlecase ? "current" : nil)
end

But that's getting a bit hard to read. I would split the class determination into another method:

def section_link(name, path)
  link_to(name, path, class: class_for(name) )
end

def class_for(name)
  name == controller.controller_name.titlecase ? "current" : nil
end
share|improve this answer
    
well, you can also use variables. If class_for is used a number of time that's ok, if it's used just once, it's overkill. – tokland Oct 7 '12 at 20:44
def section_link(name, path)     
  if name != controller_name.titlecase
    link_to(name, path)
  else
    link_to(name, path, :class => 'current')
  end
end

Or something like this

def section_link(name, path)
  link_to(name, path, :class => "#{"current" if name == controller_name.titlecase }")
end

Dont think it really needs refactoring tho, if it works...

share|improve this answer
    
-1 are better explained... – apneadiving Oct 7 '12 at 20:06
    
you give a -1 if it is a clearly wrong anwer. – Michael Koper Oct 7 '12 at 20:09
    
my point of view too... at least you have my +1 :) – apneadiving Oct 7 '12 at 20:10
    
I don't also get the -1. I strongly prefer the first snippet to the second though (this is too long and with a somewhat unclear string interpolation). – tokland Oct 7 '12 at 20:13
    
haha ok sorry i was thinking you gave me one :) – Michael Koper Oct 7 '12 at 20:14
def section_link(name, path)    
  link_to(name, path,
  *({class: "current"} if name == controller.controller_name.titlecase))
end
share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure this * will work... – tokland Oct 7 '12 at 20:42
    
@tokland nil with the splat expands to absence in Ruby 1.9. And anything else other than an array expands to itself. – sawa Oct 7 '12 at 20:58
    
and what happens when it's not nil? > helper.link_to("a", "b", *({:class => "myclass"})) NoMethodError: undefined method `stringify_keys' for [:class, "myclass"]:Array – tokland Oct 7 '12 at 21:05

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